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Shahar Keinan

How to change the sphere radius?

Is there a possibility to change the radius of the sphere? Thank you in advance, Shahar

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    Siew La Pang

    The radius is defined such that volume is normalized to 1. Therefore the radius comes out to be 0.62. And hence the pressure we calculate is p_actual/Y and the calculated energy is e_actual/Y where Y is the youngs modulus of the material with normalized volume 1. (Answered by Ishan) -Siew La

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      Shahar Keinan

      Thanks Siew La. Best, Shahar

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    Timothy S Fisher

    Hi Shahar, the tool implicitly normalizes the radius. Therefore, for monodisperse assemblies, the radius is the same for all particles. For bi-disperse, the second particle’s radius can be sized relative to the first, and for polydisperse, the size distribution can be given, with reference to the average, normalized radius. The reason that this approach is allowable is that surface effects, such as friction and cohesive forces, are neglected so that the mechanics of the problem are not size-dependent. We hope to add these features in the future. -Tim

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      Shahar Keinan

      Thank you Tim for your answer. Can you tell me what is the sphere radius that you use for monodisperse assemblies during the simulation? It looks to be around 0.62A – is this correct? Thanks, Shahar

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