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Alelign Mekonnen

how can i save my work on padre for later work?

can i copy and paste code of padre written in microsoft word?

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    Lynn Zentner

    UPDATED Information on accessing your files via SFTP:

    You can use normal Linux tools to transfer data into and out of your workspace. For example, sftp yourlogin@nanohub.org will establish a connection with your nanoHUB file share. You can also use built-in webdav support on Windows, Macintosh, and Linux operating systems to access your nanoHUB files on your local desktop.

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    Michael McLennan

    The easist way to save your work is to download it after running the simulation. There’s a little download button (green arrow icon) in the upper-right corner of the output area, just to the right of the combobox that selects which output you’re viewing. Click on this icon to download the output that you’re looking at. The output pops up in a separate browser window, so make sure that you have pop-ups enabled (not blocked) for the nanoHUB site at least.

    You can also download your work at any later point by accessing the files in your nanoHUB file share. You can do this using “sftp yourlogin@sftp.nanohub.org“ or webdav (see https://www.nanohub.org/kb/tips/how_to_use_webdav_to_access_your_nanohub_storage). Your results will be stored in one of the subdirectories under the “data/results” directory. Each of these subdirectories corresponds to a different run of Padre. The data in the various files is stored in XML format, so it’s a little harder, though not impossible, to extract. The XML contains information about the date the simulation was run, the input values, etc. All the information is there, but it’s a little hard to pick out unless you’re good at processing XML.

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