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A FREE five week course exploring the next generation of optical and opto-electronic systems.

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Abdelaali Fargi onto Pro Dev Seminar

A five-week course distilling the essentials of the materials science of rechargeable batteries.

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Abdelaali Fargi onto Pro Dev Seminar

This five-week short course aims to introduce students to bioelectricity using a unique, “bottom up” approach.

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Abdelaali Fargi onto Pro Dev Seminar

This nanotechnology course explains the fundamentals of nanoelectronics and mesoscopic physics.

Second in a two part series, this nanotechnology course provides an introduction to more advanced…

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Abdelaali Fargi onto Pro Dev Seminar

Basic Concepts presents key concepts in nanoelectronics and mesoscopic physics and relates them to the traditional view of electron flow in solids.

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Abdelaali Fargi onto Pro Dev Seminar

A two-part series of online courses covering the principles and practice of atomic force microscopy.

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Abdelaali Fargi onto Pro Dev Seminar

A free two-part series of online courses covering the principles and practice of atomic force microscopy.

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Abdelaali Fargi onto Pro Dev Seminar

A five-week course on the basic physics that govern materials at atomic scales.

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Abdelaali Fargi onto Pro Dev Seminar

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Abdelaali Fargi onto Pro Dev Seminar

The objective of this summer school on Uncertainty Quantification and its Applications is to present an accessible introduction to the basic tools of uncertainty quantification, with the goal of…

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Abdelaali Fargi onto Pro Dev Seminar

Fall 2014 Course is in production. Lectures will be added as they are produced.

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Abdelaali Fargi onto Pro Dev Seminar

Instructor: Muhammad A. Alam

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Abdelaali Fargi onto Pro Dev Seminar

This course was created by Supriyo Datta to convey key concepts of nanoelectronics and quantum transport to students with no background in quantum mechanics or statistical mechanics.

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Abdelaali Fargi onto Pro Dev Seminar

Instructor: Mark Lundstrom

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Abdelaali Fargi onto Pro Dev Seminar

This course was developed by Professor Mark Lundstrom using Professor Muhammad Alam’s lectures. It focuses on basic semiconductor physics and the physics of three important devices: 1) the PN…

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Abdelaali Fargi onto Pro Dev Seminar

This course was created by Supriyo Datta to convey key concepts of nanoelectronics and quantum transport to students assuming no background other than linear algebra, elementary differential…

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Abdelaali Fargi onto Pro Dev Seminar

An introduction to the fundamental physics required to describe materials at the molecular level. Course will include modeling and simulations.

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Abdelaali Fargi onto Pro Dev Seminar

Nanomaterial Registry data explorer

When asked, "can we provide a different kind of navigation scheme for Nano EHS data?" The IDENT explorer is what we came up with.  Give it a try.

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Michael Zentner onto Interesting Features on nanoHUB

An interesting mindmap produced by EAFIT

Sometimes it's nice to see others describe what you are, sometimes it makes you think of yourselves differently.  This is one of those cases of a description of nanoHUB by our Colombian partners.

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Michael Zentner onto Interesting Features on nanoHUB

Simulation #3 CNTs (Carbon Nano Tubes)

There are handouts of three different types of carbon nanotube structure:  Armchair, chiral, and zigzag.  The students should previously have figured out which of these matches the physical CNT model.

The handout has a hint (in math) on how to make armchair and zigzag CNTs.  Everything else will be chiral.  You can let the students guess and check, or you can explain to them how to read the mathematical description.  Then, have them try to simulate a CNT that matches the physical model.  Don't give them clues, just guide them if they need it or ask.  Many students (at least by 6th grade and 4th graders, too) are quite quick about picking up how the simulation works.

Have the students make different CNTs and look down the axis of the tube as well as look at the pattern around the top of the tube.  You can zoom in and out (very cool, especially for chiral CNTs) and it is very easy to see the spiral pattern of a chiral CNT.

Students sometimes have trouble distinguishing between chiral and armchair CNTs-- the presence of a spiral is the feature to look for.

 

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Simulation #2- Bucky Ball

You can let the students simulate whatever they like (don't force them to do the simulations you have in mind, but try to keep them at least using the carbon meshes).  They will often select the bucky ball.  In contrast to graphene, no input values are requested for the bucky ball.  Ask the students why.

Prior to this, in the building phase of the activity, you can get the students to figure out how many atoms of carbon are in a bucky ball.  Here is the best way I have found so far.

1) Have the students find the shape that makes the bucky ball round-- not flat like graphene.  (pentagon)

2) Place the bucky ball on the table, sitting on a pentagon.  There will be another pentagon directly above it.  Point this out to the students.

3)  Ask the students to work together in a group to figure out how many pentagons are in the bucky ball.  They can compare answers.  Have them keep track/ count and point so that they don't lose track of the count.  If they pick up the bucky ball and start turning it, let them try this, but after a while point out that it may be easier to keep track if they leave the bucky ball on the table.

you can provide hints related to symmetry.  Some students pick this up right away from the initial 2 opposing pentagons.

4) Ask the students to figure out how many carbon atoms are in a bucky ball.  If they start counting all the atoms, ask them whether they can think of an easier method, using some of the information they have already figured out.

You should take some time looking at the symmetry of the bucky ball so that you can see the answer yourself.

 

 

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Simulation #1 - Graphene

Introduce students to the simulation tool, and ask them to figure out (by exploration and thought) how to simulate a piece of graphene that looks like the sample that will be at the computer station.  If there is not a sample, make one that is about 2x3.  Explain to them that the repetition in the x- and y-directions can not be on some other angle.  Have them try to figure out what the repeating segment is. They can use the "Guess and Check" problem solving method.  It is not necessarily clear which direction is "x" and which is "y", so they can guess, choose some repetition numbers that they think will work, and then see what the simulation output looks like.  By iteration, they can come back and revise the Lx and Ly values to come closer to a simulation that matches.

See if they can figure out which direction is x and which is y.

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The Learning Cycle

This is the most basic version of the Learning Cycle, which is an effective way to introduce students to science concepts.

Notice that this is CONTRARY to what is often found in textbooks, which typically start with presentation of the concept, and then perhaps give examples as illustrations.

 

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Tanya Faltens onto NanoDays

The Learning Cycle

This is the most basic version of the Learning Cycle, which is an effective way to introduce students to science concepts.

Notice that this is CONTRARY to what is often found in textbooks, which typically start with presentation of the concept, and then perhaps give examples as illustrations.

 

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Tanya Faltens onto nano Educational Materials

Your Career Choices after Graduate School and The Most-Neglected Item in your Career Development

This presentation, by Dr. Gerhard Klimeck discusses working in industry, a national lab, and how to create an effective, professional presentation.

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