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Nonlinear Finite Element Analysis

Category: conference/workshop
Description: This short course on Nonlinear Finite Element Analysis has been very well received since 1985, with offerings alternating in Europe and the U.S. It has been attended by more than 2500 students, and their evaluations of the course have categorized the course as being essential training in the field. It is taught by two leading experts in the field of computational mechanics, who have won the most prestigious awards in their field and are well known for their presentation skills (see biographies). The course starts with a review of the basics of nonlinear finite element analysis, constitutive equations, element design and selection, and solvers. It then progresses to state-of-the-art methods, including current topics such as the extended finite element method, isogeometric methods, multiscale methods and mesh free methods. Important concepts are clearly explained so that students can obtain a thorough grounding in and overview of nonlinear finite element analysis.

Course Objectives
The purpose of this short course is to provide engineers, scientists and researchers with an understanding of the fundamentals and a critical survey of the state-of-art of nonlinear finite element methods in solids, structures, and fluids. The theoretical background needed for an understanding and use of nonlinear software, the computer implementation of various techniques, and modeling strategies will be treated. Advantages and shortcomings of alternative methods and the practical implications of recent research developments will be stresses. Mathematical and algorithmic developments will be explained in terms comprehensible to engineers.
When: Monday 17 August, 2009 1:00 pm BST - Friday 21 August, 2009 10:00 pm BST
Where: Austin, Texas
Website: http://feshortcourse.com/
Tags:
  1. finite element

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