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Home Groups Nano Characterization and Metrology
  • Discoverability Visible
  • Join Policy Open/Anyone
  • Created 17 Dec 2013

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Overview

Welcome to the Nano Characterization and Metrology group! If you are a student or practicing engineer or scientist who wants to learn more about nano characterization and metrology or an instructor looking for materials to use in a course, you can find material here that includes complete courses and seminars on specialized topics.

Much of the material is freely accessible by any visitor, but by joining this group, you can participate in discussions on topics of interest to you, post items to the group wiki or even work on a project with other group members. Additionally, as a group member you may receive notifications about new materials and events of interest to the nano characterization and metrology group members. Adding events to the group calendar is as easy as clicking on “add event”.

You can also contribute more substantial resources to nanoHUB through the resource contribution process, and then send a message to the group manager so that links to those resources can be added to this group.

This group contains the following:


nanoHUB-U Courses

Fundamentals of Atomic Force Microscopy, Part 1— Fundamental Aspects of AFM

Purdue University 30 Lectures
Taught by Ron Reifenberger
Selected Topics: non-contact tip-surface interactions, intra/inter molecular interactions, contact tip-surface interactions, AFM components/calibrations, force spectroscopy, contact mode Imaging, VEDA

Fundamentals of Atomic Force Microscopy, Part 2— Dynamic AFM Methods

Purdue University 30 Lectures
Taught by Arvind Raman
Selected Topics: dynamic AFM, using VEDA, reconstructing surface forces, dynamic AFM for electrostatics, magnetics and biology.


Graduate Courses

Atomic Force Microscopy

Fundamentals of Atomic Force Microscopy

ME 597/ PHYS 570 at Purdue University (Fall 2009) 28 Lectures
Taught by Ron Reifenberger and Arvind Raman
Selected Topics: quantum mechanics, tunneling, STM, interactions forces, dynamic AFM, modeling, cantilever eigenmodes, phase contrast, peak forces, electrostatic forces, nanolighography

Fundamentals of Atomic Force Microscopy

ME 597/ PHYS 570 at Purdue University (Fall 2010). 27 Lectures.
Taught by Ron Reifenberger and Arvind Raman
Selected Topics: quantum tunneling, STM, transition from STM to AFM, interaction forces, contact mechanics, force distance curves, calibrations, virtual environments, dynamic AFM, cantilever eigenmodes, peak forces, frequency modulated AFM,

VEDA Manual

VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENT FOR DYNAMIC AFM Version 2.0 First Time User’s Manual

AFM Metrology of Cellulose Nanocrystals

By Robert J. Moon1Ryan Wagner2

1. Materials Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 2. Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN

 

 

Optical Microscopy

Optical Imaging

ECE 460 at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (2011) 26 Lectures.
Taught by Gabriel Popescu
Selected Topics: math toolbox, properties of light, geometrical optics, eye opticals, wave optics, fourier optics, spatial/temporal fields, coherence, scalar fields, Gaussian beams, Jones matrices

Principles of Optical Imaging

ECE 460 at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (Fall 2008). 6 Lectures.
Taught by Gabriel Popescu
Selected Topics: electrical magnetic fields, frequency domain, Green’s function, Fourier transformation, geometrical optics, Fermat’s principle, Snell’s Law, Schlieren Method, light scattering, transport equation

Modern Light Microscopy

ECE 564 at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (Fall 2012). 15 Lectures.
Taught by Gabriel Popescu
Selected Topics: quantitative phase imaging in biomedicine, Fourier transforms, Gaussian beams, dispersive media, inhomogeneous media, light scattering, coherence

Electron Microscopy

Scanning Electron Microscope

By John C. Bean

University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA

This resource describes a scanning electron microscope (SEM). It includes detailed depictions of how the electron beam is focused and used to create hugely magnified images of experimental specimens.  It was created as part of the University of Virginia Virtual Science Lab.

Transmission Electron Microscopy Skills

MSE 582 at Purdue University (2008) 12 Lectures.
Taught by Eric Stach (2008).
Selected Topics: electrons, detection, vacuum science, sample preparation, scattering, diffraction, high-resolution TEM, electron microscopy

Transmission Electron Microscopy and Crystalline Imperfections

MSE 640 at Purdue University (2008) 16 Lectures.
Taught by Eric Stach (2008).
Selected Topics: elastic scattering, Laue diffraction, reciprocal lattice, crystals, planar faults, phase contrast, high-resolution TEM, STEM imaging, x-ray production, EELS

Electronic Characterization

Device Characterization with the Keithley 4200-SCS

Purdue University (2010) 12 Lectures.
Taught by Lee Stauffer
Selected Topics: DCi-V Source measurement, Keithley interactive test environment (KITE), operation and measurement, measurement techniques, ultra fast I-V

Other Characterization Methods

Fundamentals of Particle Image Velocimetry

Purdue University (2014)
Taught by Steve Wereley
Selected Topics: Tracer Particles, Particle Flow, Seeding, Illumination, Recording, Cameras, Image Analysis.

Sequencing a Genome by a Torrent of Ions: How an Old pH-Meter Got Its Groove Back

The ability to read the book of life, written in the genome of an organism, has been one of the most exciting development of our time. The first version of human genome was announced circa 2000 and it took a decade of industrial-scale collaboration and billions of dollars of funding. Today, we do the same for a few hundred dollars, and in a few hours time. In merely 10 years, the reactors that covered a football field has been reduced to the size of a postage-stamp. This seminar explains how a synthesis of electronics and biotechnology, especially the use of electronic biosensor made of i-phone scale transistors, has made this fantastic development possible.



nanoHUB.org, a resource for nanoscience and nanotechnology, is supported by the National Science Foundation and other funding agencies. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.