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  • Organization
    Boston University

  • Employment Type
    University / College Faculty

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  • Biography

    Professor, Physics Department, Boston University

    Bennett B. Goldberg (BA’82, MS’84, PhD’87) was born in Boston, Mass. in 1959 (a life-long Red Sox fan). He received a B.A from Harvard College in 1982, an M.S. and Ph.D. in Physics from Brown University in 1984 and 1987. Following a Bantrell Post-doctoral appointment at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Francis Bitter National Magnet Lab, he joined the physics faculty at Boston University in 1989.

    Goldberg is a Professor of Physics, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, and Professor of Biomedical Engineering. He is currently Chairman of the Physics Department and his active research interests are in the general area of ultra-high resolution microscopy and spectroscopy techniques for hard and soft materials systems. He has worked in near-field imaging of photonic bandgap, ring microcavity and single-mode waveguide devices and has recently developed subsurface solid immersion microscopy for Si inspection. His group is working on novel approaches to subcellular imaging with interferometric fluorescenent techniques, and in biosensor fabrication and development of waveguide evanescent bio-imaging techniques. Nano-optics research includes Raman scattering of individual nanotubes and nano-optics of electron systems in quantum wells and quantum dot structures.

    Goldberg is Director of Boston University’s new Center for Nanoscience and Nanobiotechnology, an interdisciplinary center that brings together academic and industrial scientists and engineers in the development of nanotechnology with applications in materials and biomedicine.


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