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Profile

  • Organization
    Ohio State University

  • Employment Type
    University / College Faculty

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  • Biography

    Wolfgang Windl, Ph.D., Associate Professor at the Ohio State University, Columbus, USA. Professor Windl works in the area of Nanoscale Computational Materials Science. His field of expertise is in the area of atomistic simulations, especially within density-functional theory. Currently, he works on nanostructured interfaces and molecule-surface interactions of semiconductor device systems. Previously, he spent four years with Motorola, first as Senior Staff Scientist in Motorola’s Computational Materials Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory, and later as a Principal Staff Scientist in the Digital DNA Laboratories in Austin, Texas, where he was working in the area of multiscale modeling of semiconductor processing. Before that, he held postdoctoral positions at Los Alamos National Laboratory and Arizona State University. He received his diploma and doctoral degree in physics from the University of Regensburg, Germany. Wolfgang Windl is on the editorial board of the Journal of Computational Electronics and the Journal of Theoretical and Computational Nanoscience. Among others, he has been Chairman of the International Conference on Computational Nanoscience (www.nsti.org) and is recipient of 1998 and 1999 Patent and Licensing Awards from Los Alamos National Laboratory for his contributions to the molecular modeling code CLSMAN. He has given more than 30 invited talks at international conferences and research institutions and has been awarded twice the “Best Teacher” recognition of the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at The Ohio State University.


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