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  • Organization
    University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

  • Employment Type
    University / College Faculty

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  • Biography

    Michael F. Insana received his PhD in medical physics from the University of Wisconsin, Madison in 1983. His dissertation topic was acoustic scattering and absorption in biological tissues. He was a research physicist at the FDA from 1984-1987, Professor of Radiology and Physiology at the University of Kansas Medical Center from 1987-1999, and Professor of Biomedical Engineering at the University of California, Davis from 1999-2004. Currently, Mike is Professor of Bioengineering at UIUC and an affiliate faculty member of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department and the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology.

    His research focuses on the development of novel ultrasonic instrumentation and methods for imaging soft tissue microstructure, elasticity and blood flow. The goal is to understand basic mechanisms of lesion formation, disease progression, and responses to therapy. His research includes the fundamentals of imaging system design and performance evaluation, signal processing, detection and estimation. His lab uses hydrogels to develop models of visco- and poroelastic behavior of soft tissues for cancer imaging. Through collaborations with industry, Insana’s lab is investigating spatio-temporal filtering for noise reduction and enhanced spatial resolution with applications in breast elasticity imaging and arterial-wall shear-stress estimation.

    Mike is currently a member of the IEEE and Acoustical Society of America, Fellow of the Institute of Physics, and Associate Editor for IEEE Transaction on Medical Imaging.


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