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  • Organization
    NASA Ames Research Center

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    Dr. Jun Li is a physical scientist with NASA at Ames Research Center\'s Nanotechnology Center. His current research interests focus on the development of new methods to integrate the nanostructured materials to micro- and macro- sized devices in which the unique properties of individual nanoelements are utilized to improve the performance. The approach is to combine the lithographic/nonlithographic patterning, self-assembly, catalytic growth, semiconductor processing techniques, and chemical functionalization to build individual nanoelements such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and semiconducting nanowires (SNWs) into large-scale integrated devices. Currently he is working on CNT nanoelectrode arrays targeting at the development of ultrasensitive biosensors and the exploration of carbon nanotubes for integrate circuit interconnects.

    Dr. Li received BS degree in chemistry from Wuhan University (P.R. China) in 1987, MS and PhD degree in chemistry from Princeton University in 1991 and 1995, respectively. From 1994 to 1997, he held a postdoctoral research associate position in Chemistry Department of Cornell University. He worked for Molecular Imaging Co. from 1997 to 1998 and the Institute of Materials Research and Engineering in Singapore from 1998 to 2000. He joined NASA Ames Research Center in 2000.


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