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Purdue University Physics Seminars

By Joseph M. Cychosz

Network for Computational Nanotechnology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN

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Series

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Abstract

A collection of seminars present in either Purdue University Department of Physics’ General Colloquia or Condensed Matter Seminar Series.

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Cite this work

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

  • Joseph M. Cychosz (2012), "Purdue University Physics Seminars," http://nanohub.org/resources/11205.

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Location

Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN

In This Series

  1. Putting the Electron’s Spin to Work

    14 Apr 2011 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Daniel Ralph

    I will discuss recent progress in experimental techniques to control the orientations of nanoscale magnetic moments and electron spins, and to use these new means of control for applications. One powerful new capability arises from the fact that thin magnetic layers can act as filters for spins.

  2. Of Soot and Sunflowers

    16 Dec 2014 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Christopher M. Sorensen

    In this talk I will describe some of my researches into soot and other aggregate structures; an unlikely journey of discovery to find fractal structures with non-Euclidian dimensionality, gel networks of graphene that tenuously span space and common Fibonacci themes between spirals, sunflowers...

  3. A Half Century of Nonlinear Optics

    22 Mar 2011 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Robert W. Boyd

    In this talk, we first present a review of the development of the field of nonlinear optics, and we then survey some areas of recent research including quantum imaging and implications of the ability to control the group velocity of light.

  4. Nanoscale Spectroscopy and Plasmonics in Infrared

    19 Apr 2012 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Mikhail Belkin

    In this talk, I will present the results of two of our research projects. I will start with a simple technique for nanoscale mid-infrared spectroscopy that we have developed recently. Subwavelength resolution is achieved by detecting optical absorption through measuring local photothermal...

  5. The Secret Life of Electrons in High Temperature Superconductors

    19 Jun 2013 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Erica W. Carlson

  6. Physics of the Piano

    12 Jul 2013 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Nicholas J. Giordano

    Why does a piano sound like a piano? A similar question can be asked of virtually all musical instruments. A particular note, such as middle C, can be produced by a piano, a violin, and a clarinet. Yet, it is easy for even a musically untrained listener to distinguish between these instruments....

  7. Catching Sunlight: Lessons from Photosynthesis

    10 Jul 2013 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Sergei Savikhin

    We will discuss the physics of early processes in photosynthesis revealed by ultrafast laser spectroscopy.

  8. Nanoscale Electrothermal Energy Transport

    12 Jul 2013 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Ali Shakouri

    Thermoreflectance imaging is used to study Peltier cooling and Joule heating in devices with 800ps time and submicron spatial resolution. The ballistic heat conduction and the transition between energy and entropy transport in ultra short times and in thin film devices will be discussed. Finally...

  9. Quantum Band Engineering in III-nitride Semiconductors

    12 Oct 2013 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Oana Malis

    In this talk I will focus on our efforts to creatively exploit the unique properties of nano-structured III-nitride materials for novel light emitters and detectors in the currently under-developed near- and far-infrared ranges. Due to large electron effective mass, the nitride intersubband...

  10. Sequencing a Genome by a Torrent of Ions: How an Old pH-Meter Got Its Groove Back

    11 Apr 2014 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Muhammad A. Alam

    The ability to read the book of life, written in the genome of an organism, has been one of the most exciting development of our time. The first version of human genome was announced circa 2000 and it took a decade of industrial-scale collaboration and billions of dollars of funding. Today, we...

  11. Strain Engineering of 2D Crystals

    08 Oct 2014 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Bennett Goldberg

    Two-dimensional materials are flexible, transparent, compatible with living systems, and can enable new devices and physics based on their unique properties. One unique property is the ability of 2D crystals a single atom thick to undergo massive amounts of strain without failure. Since strain...

  12. Optically Probing the Nanoarchitecture of Cells and Tissues

    19 Mar 2015 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Steven L. Jacques

    This seminar presents our current work on using light to probe the nanoarchitecture (1-1000 nm) of cells and tissues. In particular, our experiments with SHG and holographic imaging of angular scattering of photons explore the structure of collagen fibers. Our work with confocal reflectance...

  13. Incorporation of Studio Exercises for Physics Instruction at all Levels

    11 Dec 2014 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Christopher M. Sorensen

    In this talk I will give examples of studio activities from all three and observations with regard to how well this form of instruction works. I will also discuss problems incurred with regard to class size and time limitations. My goal is to encourage my audience to implement studio instruction...

  14. Integrated Imaging: Creating Images from the Tight Integration of Algorithms, Computation, and Sensors

    21 Apr 2015 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Charles Addison Bouman

    This talk presents some examples of state-of-the-art integrated imaging systems based on computed tomography (CT), transmission electron microscopy (STEM), synchrotron beam imaging, optical sensing, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). For each of these examples, we also explore their use and...

  15. Teaching Writing in Introductory Physics: the Good, the Bad, and the Revision

    21 Apr 2015 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Scott Bonham

    Written communication is an important skill in almost every field, including science and engineering. Over the last five years I have been evaluating different approaches for teaching and supporting development of technical writing skills. A common approach is providing students with written...

  16. Women and Physics

    13 May 2015 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Laura McCullough

    A discussion of some of the issues surrounding women's participation in physics. What comes with being of the feminine persuasion in a physics world?  What hinders women's participation in physics?  What helps?  Why is it important?  The fun and occasional fury of...

  17. Teaching Science with Science Fiction

    13 May 2015 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Kelly McCullough, Laura McCullough

    Science fiction is one possible tool for increasing engagement in science classrooms, as well as offering opportunities for modeling scientific thinking, illustrating points of scientific interest, and addressing reading and writing standards for classroom content. Join Laura and Kelly...

  18. Progress in Superconducting Qubits

    04 May 2015 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Robert F. McDermott

    I will review progress in the field, with a focus on recent work in Wisconsin in the areas of decoherence and quantum measurement. I will discuss efforts to identify and suppress the dominant source of qubit dephasing, and I will describe a new approach to scalable, high-fidelity qubit...

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