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[Illinois] Biophotonics 2012: How Physics and Modern Computers Have Revolutionized Imaging

By Paul Scott Carney

Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL

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Abstract

Bio

Professor Carney is an Associate Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Illinois. He is a theorist with research interests in inverse problems, imaging, coherence theory and other branches of optical physics and works closely with a number of great experimenters. Prof. Carney is widely respected for having written the seminal papers in the field of near-field inverse scattering. He has brought the tools of inverse scattering to bear on optical coherence tomography with resulting innovations that have been spun-out into a successful medical imaging start-up. His current interests include problems in inverse-scattering, the statistical optics of fast pulses, and spectroscopy.

Prof Carney holds a BS in Engineering Physics from UIUC (1994), and a PhD in Physics from the University of Rochester (1999, advisor: Emil Wolf). He was a post-doctoral associate at Washington University from 1999 to 2001 when he joined the faculty of UIUC ECE.

(Source: http://www.ece.illinois.edu/directory/profile.asp?carney)

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Researchers should cite this work as follows:

  • Paul Scott Carney (2012), "[Illinois] Biophotonics 2012: How Physics and Modern Computers Have Revolutionized Imaging," http://nanohub.org/resources/14077.

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Submitter

Charlie Newman, NanoBio Node

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

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