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[Illinois] Biophotonics 2012: A Tutorial on Optical Characterization Methods; VI1, VI2, VI3, VI4

By Lynford Goddard

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

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Abstract

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Bio

Dr. Lynford Goddard's research group, the Photonic Systems Laboratory, studies the ways that light, and lasers in particular, can be used for sensing and measurement, communications, and data processing. The research focuses on fabricating, characterizing, and modeling individual lasers and photodetectors, photonics-based sensors, instrumentation, and integrated circuits, as well as developing new processing, inspection, and characterization techniques, and testing novel semiconductor materials and devices. Applications include hydrogen detection for fuel cells, carbon dioxide detection for reducing post harvest food loss, optical spectrum analysis and quantitative phase microscopy for metrology, integrated microring Bragg reflectors for narrow linewidth lasers and next generation chip-scale communication systems, and optical logic, memory and switches for high speed data processing. (Source: http://www.ece.illinois.edu/directory/profile.asp?lgoddard)

Cite this work

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

  • Lynford Goddard (2012), "[Illinois] Biophotonics 2012: A Tutorial on Optical Characterization Methods; VI1, VI2, VI3, VI4," http://nanohub.org/resources/14082.

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Submitter

Charlie Newman, NanoBio Node

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

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