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Quantum Transport: Atom to Transistor (Spring 2004)

By Supriyo Datta

Purdue University

 

Newer version available

Newer version available

This resource has a newer version available at https://nanohub.org/courses/FON1

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Abstract

image

Spring 2004

Please Note:
A newer version of this course is now available
and we would greatly appreciate your feedback regarding the new format and contents.

Course Information Website

The development of "nanotechnology" has made it possible to engineer materials and devices on a length scale as small as several nanometers (atomic distances are ~ 0.1 nm). The properties of such "nanostructures" cannot be described in terms of macroscopic parameters like mobility and diffusion coefficient and a microscopic or atomistic viewpoint is called for. The purpose of this course is to convey the conceptual framework that underlies this microscopic theory of matter which developed in course of the 20th century following the advent of quantum mechanics. However, this requires us to discuss a lot more than just quantum mechanics - it requires an appreciation of some of the most advanced concepts of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics. Traditionally these topics are spread out over many physics/ chemistry courses that take many semesters to cover. Our aim is to condense the essential concepts into a one semester course using electrical engineering related examples. The only background we assume is matrix algebra including familiarity with MATLAB (or an equivalent mathematical software package). We use MATLAB-based numerical examples to provide concrete illustrations and we strongly recommend that the students set up their own computer program on a PC to reproduce the results. This hands-on experience is needed to grasp such deep and diverse concepts in so short a time.

Questions and Answers: We are introducing a questions and answers page for this course. Questions along with
answers for specific lectures can be found
here.

Text Book: The text book for this course, Quantum Transport: Atom to Transistor is available from Cambridge University Press.

Credits: The lecture notes have been prepared by Kirk Bevan and Behtash Behinaein (with editing by Desireé Skaggs) from Prof. Datta's regular classroom lectures.
The Breeze lectures were prepared by Joe Cychosz and Mike Skaggs.

Publications

  • Cover image

    Quantum Transport: Atom to Transistor

    by Supriyo Datta (Cambridge - July 11, 2005)

    This book presents a unique approach to the fundamentals of quantum transport, and is aimed at senior undergraduate and graduate students. Some of the most advanced concepts of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics are included and yet no prior acquaintance with quantum mechanics is assumed.

Cite this work

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

  • Supriyo Datta (2006), "Quantum Transport: Atom to Transistor (Spring 2004)," http://nanohub.org/resources/1490.

    BibTex | EndNote

Tags

Lecture Number/Topic Online Lecture Video Lecture Notes Supplemental Material Suggested Exercises
ECE 659 Lecture 1: Energy Level Diagram View Flash Notes
ECE 659 Lecture 2: What Makes Electrons Flow? View Flash Notes
Reference Chapter 1.2

ECE 659 Lecture 3: The Quantum of Conductance View Flash Notes
Reference Chapter 1.3

ECE 659 Lecture 4: Charging/Coulomb Blockade View Flash Notes
Reference Chapter 1.4 and 1.5

ECE 659 Lecture 5: Summary/Towards Ohm's Law View Flash Notes
Reference Chapter 1.4 and 1.5

ECE 659 Lecture 6: Schrödinger Equation: Basic Concepts View Flash Notes
Reference Chapter 2.1

ECE 659 Lecture 7: Schrödinger Equation: Method of Finite Differences View Flash Notes
Reference Chapter 2.2

ECE 659 Lecture 8: Schrödinger Equation: Examples View Flash Notes
Reference Chapter 2.3

ECE 659 Lecture 9: Self Consistent Field: Basic Concept View Flash Notes
Reference Chapter 3.1

ECE 659 Lecture 10: Self Consistent Field: Relation to the Multi-Electron Picture View Flash Notes
Reference Chapter 3.2

ECE 659 Lecture 11: Self Consistent Field: Bonding View Flash Notes
Reference Chapter 3.3

ECE 659 Lecture 12: Basis Functions: As a Computatinal Tool View Flash Notes
Reference Chapter 4.1

ECE 659 Lecture 13: Basis Functions: As a Conceptual Tool View Flash Notes
Reference Chapter 4.2

ECE 659 Lecture 14: Basis Functions: Density Matrix I View Flash Notes
Reference Chapter 4.3

ECE 659 Lecture 15: Basis Functions: Density Matrix II View Flash Notes
Reference Chapter 4.3 and 4.4

ECE 659 Lecture 16: Band Structure: Toy Examples View Flash Notes
Reference Chapter 5.1

ECE 659 Lecture 17: Band Structure: Beyond 1-D View Flash Notes
Reference Chapter 5.2

ECE 659 Lecture 18: Band Structure: 3-D Solids View Flash Notes
Reference Chapter 5.3

ECE 659 Lecture 19: Band Structure: Prelude to Sub-Bands View Flash Notes
Reference Chapter 5.2

ECE 659 Lecture 20: Subbands: Quantum Wells, Wires, Dots and Nano-Tubes View Flash Notes
Reference Chapter 6.1

ECE 659 Lecture 21: Subbands: Density of States View Flash Notes
Reference Chapter 6.2

ECE 659 Lecture 22: Subbands: Minimum Resistance of a Wire View Flash Notes
Reference Chapter 6.3 and 6.4

ECE 659 Lecture 23: Capacitance: Model Hamiltonian View Flash Notes
Reference Chapter 7.1

ECE 659 Lecture 24: Capacitance: Electron Density View Flash Notes
Reference Chapter 7.2

ECE 659 Lecture 25: Capacitance: Quantum vs. Electrostatic Capacitance View Flash Notes
Reference Chapter 7.3

ECE 659 Lecture 26: Level Broadening: Open Systems and Local Density of States View Flash Notes
Reference Chapter 8.1 and 8.2

ECE 659 Lecture 27: Level Broadening: Self Energy View Flash Notes
Reference Chapter 8.2

ECE 659 Lecture 28: Level Broadening: Lifetime View Flash Notes
Reference Chapter 8.3

ECE 659 Lecture 29: Level Broadening: Irreversibility View Flash Notes
Reference Chapter 8.4

ECE 659 Lecture 30: Coherent Transport: Overview View Flash Notes
Reference Chapter 9.1

ECE 659 Lecture 31: Coherent Transport: Transmission and Examples View Flash Notes
Reference Chapter 9.4 and 9.5

ECE 659 Lecture 32: Coherent Transport: Non-Equilibrium Density Matrix View Flash Notes
Reference Chapter 9.2

ECE 659 Lecture 33: Coherent Transport: Inflow/Outflow View Flash Notes
Reference Chapter 9.3

ECE 659 Lecture 34: Non-Coherent Transport: Why does an Atom Emit Light? View Flash Notes
Reference Chapter 10.1

ECE 659 Lecture 35: Non-Coherent Transport: Radiative Lifetime View Flash Notes
Reference Chapter 10.1 and 10.2

ECE 659 Lecture 36: Non-Coherent Transport: Radiative Transitions View Flash Notes
Reference Chapter 10.1 and 10.2

ECE 659 Lecture 37: Non-Coherent Transport: Phonons, Emission and Absorption View Flash Notes
Reference Chapter 10.2 and 10.4

ECE 659 Lecture 38: Non-Coherent Transport: Inflow/Outflow View Flash Notes
Reference Chapter 9.4 and 10.3

ECE 659 Lecture 39: Atom to Transistor: "Physics" of Ohm's Law View Flash Notes
Reference Chapter 11.2

ECE 659 Lecture 40: Self Consistent Field Method and Its Limitations View Flash Notes
Reference Chapter 1.5 and 11.4

ECE 659 Lecture 41: Coulomb Blockade View Flash Notes
Reference Chapter 3.4

ECE 659 Lecture 41a: Coulomb Blockade View Flash Notes
Reference Chapter 3.4

ECE 659 Lecture 42: Spin View Flash Notes
Reference Chapter 5.4 and 5.5

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