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[Illinois] ECE 416 Bio Structure/Function I

By Brian Cunningham

Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL

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Abstract

           In this lecture, we are given the structure of the protein, its function, role and potentials to the field of biosensors. The parts of the amino acids that make up the proteins are discussed along with bonds and reactions in order to connect these monomers. The structure of the protein is also given through the four levels that develop the protein: Primary, Secondary, Tertiary, and Quaternary structures. Connecting this back to biosensors, each protein has a specific shape due to the amino acid pattern. This shape allows it to make a relationship with specific substrates which on the biosensor surface can help to catch the specific molecules possible. This focuses on the selectivity aspect of the biosensor. Antibodies are also discussed and their potential roles in the selectivity of biosensors.

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Researchers should cite this work as follows:

  • Brian Cunningham (2013), "[Illinois] ECE 416 Bio Structure/Function I," http://nanohub.org/resources/16715.

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Location

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL

Submitter

NanoBio Node, Obaid Sarvana, George Daley

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

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