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Multiscale Manufacturing of Fractal Structures

By Charalabos (Haris) Doumanidis

Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Cyprus, Nicosia, Cyprus

Published on

Abstract

Our recent analytical explorations and insights into the nanoworld have afforded us with new opportunities and challenges in multi-scale synthesis and manufacture of useful devices and systems, to carry unprecedented functionalities all the way to our macroworld for energy, aerospace and biomedical applications. This lecture overviews the philosophy and background of the presenter’s research group in thermomechanical materials processing and manufacturing process modeling and control by scanned distributed-parameter, dynamic adaptive techniques. It also elaborates on his current investigations in random fractal-structured materials and structures, such as: Nanoheater sources made of reactive material multi-layers for microjoining, electronics, hyperthermias, self-sintering materials etc; Featherweight composites with nanoparticulates by ultrasonic methods for the aviation and wind turbine industry; and Bioscaffolds by fiber electrospinning for intestinal tissue engineering and delivery of growth factors, antibiotics and cancer drugs. The presentation also projects new research directions in fractal manufacturing and design of multiscale architectures such photodendra, membranes and vascular tissue scaffolds for humanitarian engineering. Research activities are coupled with related educational curricula, laboratory design and innovation activities, as well as outreach and administration initiatives through the Nanomanufacturing Program at the National Science Foundation.

Bio

Charalabos (Haris) Doumanidis Prof. Charalabos (Haris) Doumanidis holds his Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1988). He has been a Professor and Director of the Thermal Manufacturing Laboratory at Tufts University in Medford, MA (1991-2000); Chief Scientist with Axcelis Technologies (Thermal Processing Systems) in Beverly, MA (2000-01); Professor (2003-present)and founding Head of the Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering Dept (2004-06) and founding Director of the Hephaistos Nanotechnology Research Center at the University of Cyprus (2006-2009); Visiting Professor at MIT (2006-07); the founding Director of the Nanomanufacturing Program at the National Science Foundation (NSF) in Arlington, Virginia (2001-03, 2006-07 and 2010-11); and consultant for the automation, optoelectronics, biomedical and automotive industry. His research and teaching interests include nanoscale fabrication, rapid thermal processing and laser annealing of semiconductors, distributed parameter system modeling and control, robotics and mechatronics, and biomedical instrumentation. He is the organizer and chair of over 20 symposia for ASME, IEEE, NSF etc; speaker of over 30 keynote/plenary lectures and 100 invited seminars; the author of over 200 refereed papers, distinguished by 4 best paper awards (ASME, ACC, ISNM, ICMCTF), nine patents and four book chapters. He is a recipient of the Marie Curie Chair of Excellence (2004) by the European Commission, the ASME Blackall Award (2002), the Presidential Faculty Fellow Award by the White House (1996), the NSF Young Investigator (1994) and the Research Initiation Award (1992), as well as several grants from the EC, NSF, SME, Honda R&D Americas etc. He mentors the research planning of many junior investigators at UCY and the USA, and his three children.

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Cite this work

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

  • Charalabos (Haris) Doumanidis (2013), "Multiscale Manufacturing of Fractal Structures," http://nanohub.org/resources/17143.

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Location

Kranert Auditorium, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN

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