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Nanoelectronics 101

By Mark Lundstrom

Purdue University

Published on

Abstract

Semiconductor device technology has transformed our world with supercomputers, personal computers, cell phones, ipods, and much more that we now take for granted. Moore’s Law, posited by Intel co-founder Gordon Moore in 1965, states that the number of transistors (the basic building blocks of electronic systems) per chip doubles each technology generation. This doubling of transistor density has led to an exponential growth in the capability of electronic systems and an exponential decrease in their cost. The microelectronic technology of the 1960’s has evolved into today’s nanoelectronics technology. This talk gives a brief overview of the history of electronics, a look at where it stands today, and some thoughts about where electronics is heading.

Cite this work

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

  • Mark Lundstrom (2006), "Nanoelectronics 101," http://nanohub.org/resources/1737.

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Time

Location

Physics, Room 242

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