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[Illinois] BioNanotechnology and Nanomedicine: Applications in Cancer and Mechanobiology Lecture 25: Force Traction Microscopy: A Review

By Alireza Tofangchi

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

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Abstract


BioNanotechnology and Nanomedicine: Applications in Cancer and Mechanobiology provides an introduction to basic concepts of nanotechnology in mechanobiology and in cancer. This is a highly interdisciplinary field of research where knowledge from various disciplines is presented and integrated. The course is team taught by faculty from Engineering and LAS. There are four main sections of the course; (i) introduction to nanotechnology and nanomedicine; (ii) biological concepts and cancer biology; (iii) applications in cancer, i.e. cancer nanotechnology; and (iv) applications in cellular mechanics, i.e. mechanobiology and nanotechnology. The course is intended for first year graduate students and upper level undergraduates.

Bio

Alireza Tofangchi is a Researcher at Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. In the past he has served as an energy analyst for the Institute of Energy Economics in Japan, and as a research associate at TU Darmstadt in Germany.

Cite this work

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

  • Alireza Tofangchi (2013), "[Illinois] BioNanotechnology and Nanomedicine: Applications in Cancer and Mechanobiology Lecture 25: Force Traction Microscopy: A Review," http://nanohub.org/resources/18286.

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Location

University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL

Submitter

NanoBio Node, Zuhaib Bashir Sheikh

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

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