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CQT Introduction

By Supriyo Datta

Purdue University

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    Tanya Faltens

    5.0 out of 5 stars

    Today’s state-of-the-art transistors are now so small that new ways are needed to describe the behavior of the electrons in the device— methods that use quantum mechanics. Quantum mechanics is a topic that many engineers haven’t spent a lot of time studying, especially if they took classes that used classical models to describe electronic behavior.

    This 17 minute introductory lecture presents a very clear picture of what Quantum Transport is, and where we would encounter it in modern devices. It presents the main ideas at a conceptual level that should be accessible to engineering students and practicing engineers who are interested in brushing up on the latest ideas.

    It presents a new conceptual framework, the “Unified Model for Quantum Transport”, along with some of the limitations of this model and of our current understanding.

    The content can be learned in-depth through a full semester-length course (ECE 659), or the main ideas can be gleaned from the shorter 4-lecture series on quantum transport that this video introduces.

    The lectures in this series are:

    1) Nanodevices and Maxwell’s Demon— illustrating the interplay of dynamics and thermodynamics in transport physics problems.

    2) Electrical Resistance: A Simple Model — This model quantitatively describes current flow in nanoscale structures and relates it back to the macroscopic properties, such as Ohm’s Law.

    3) Probabilities, Wavefunctions and Green Functions — This extends the simple model into a “full-blown” model that combines the Non-Equilibrium Green Function method with the Landauer approach.

    4) Coulomb Blockade and Fock Space — Shows the limitations of the models described so far and introduces a new approach to calculating current flow in small structures that is based on the concept of Fock space, which is widely used in solid state physics. This lecture also introduces entanglement and correlation.

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