DIY BIOSENSORS Summer 2014 Workshop

By Kaustubh Bhalerao

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Category

Workshops

Published on

Abstract

Learn how to build a simple, low cost sensor to detect spoiled milk using simple materials that illustrate cool concepts such as microfluidics, sample processing and biodetection.

In this project you will design microfluidic patterns, construct them out of clear plastic film, add reagents to the microfluidic devices, test their behavior when exposed to fresh and spoiled milk and report your results. At the end of the workshop you will get to keep your sensor.

Building a spoiled milk sensor 

  1. Understand the fundamentals of biosensing. 
  2. Obtain an overview of sample processing and microfluidics. 
  3. Design and build simple microfluidic systems. 
  4. Build a simple pH sensor using the microfluidic systems. 
  5. Participate in device design and user interface considerations for a sensor device. 
  6. Learn the importance of teamwork and distributed tasks in any non-trivial device engineering process. 
  7. Show off your work! 

This nanoBIO node workshop is a one week intensive high school Workshop on biosensors led by Kaustubh Bhalerao from the department of Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering at the University of Illinois. 

 

Bio

Kaustubh Bhalerao obtained his M.S. and Ph.D degrees from Department of Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering at The Ohio State University in 2001 and 2004 respectively. His doctoral dissertation was on the reliability of micro electromechanical systems used in biological applications (BioMEMS). He is an associate professor and has been a faculty member in the Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering since 2005.

Sponsored by

nanoBIO node

Cite this work

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

  • Kaustubh Bhalerao (2014), "DIY BIOSENSORS Summer 2014 Workshop," http://nanohub.org/resources/21200.

    BibTex | EndNote

Location

University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL

Submitter

NanoBio Node, Aly Taha

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Tags

In This Workshop

  1. [Illinois] DIY BIOSENSORS Day 1 Summer 2014 Workshop

    26 Jun 2014 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Kaustubh Bhalerao

    In Day 1, the lecture starts out by discussing the three definitions of a biosensor. These definitions are: something that measures a physical process, something that measures a molecular signature of a process, or a sensor that uses biological materials that may or may not measure biological...

  2. [Illinois] DIY BIOSENSORS Day 2 Summer 2014 Workshop

    28 Jun 2014 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Kaustubh Bhalerao

    In Day 2, the students start out by brainstorming a design for their biosensor and the shape that they will cut it in. The students start their first prototype and build throughout the video.This nanoBIO node workshop is a one week intensive high school Workshop on biosensors led by Kaustubh...

  3. [Illinois] DIY BIOSENSORS Day 3 Summer 2014 Workshop

    03 Jul 2014 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Kaustubh Bhalerao

    In Day 3, the students continue building their first models of the biosensors. Once completed, they test out their newly-built biosensor with spoiled milk and evaluate their design. The students then start designing their second prototype. At the end, then discussed and reevaluated their...

  4. [Illinois] DIY BIOSENSORS Day 4 Summer 2014 Workshop

    28 Jun 2014 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Kaustubh Bhalerao

    In Day 4, the second prototype biosensors continued to be tested. The thought process of building an effective biosensor was then discussed. There were five steps taken: the design objective, design criteria, first prototype, lessons learned, and second prototype. Each of these steps was then...

  5. [Illinois] DIY BIOSENSORS Day 5 Summer 2014 Workshop

    28 Jun 2014 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Kaustubh Bhalerao

    In Day 5, each group gave a presentation about the biosensor they had created. They discussed the design objective, design criteria, first prototype, lessons learned, and the second prototype. In trying to depict their biosensor as the best, they learned what is sought from the market when...