Support

Support Options

Submit a Support Ticket

 

Computing Research Institute Seminars

See also

No results found.

Category

Series

Published on

Abstract

CRI sponsors a regular seminar series that features local, national and international speakers who are recognized in their fields. CRI seminars cover topics in computational science, computational life science, computer systems technology, and nano-computation.

Website: Computer Research Institute

Cite this work

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

  • (2007), "Computing Research Institute Seminars," http://nanohub.org/resources/2166.

    BibTex | EndNote

Tags

No classroom usage data was found. You may need to enable JavaScript to view this data.

In This Series

  1. Computing the Horribleness of Soft Condensed Matter

    19 Oct 2007 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Eric Jakobsson

    A great triumph of computer simulations 40 years ago was to make the liquid state of matter understandable in terms of physical interactions between individual molecules. Prior to the first simulations of liquid argon and liquid water in the 1960's, there was no quantitatively rigorous molecular...

  2. First Principles-Based Modeling of materials: Towards Computational Materials Design

    20 Apr 2006 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Alejandro Strachan

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with accurate, first principles-based interatomic potentials is a powerful tool to uncover and characterize the molecular-level mechanisms that govern the chemical, mechanical and optical properties of materials. Such fundamental understanding is critical to...

  3. On Modeling Metabolic Systems

    04 Jan 2007 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Doraiswami Ramkrishna

    Modeling metabolism has been generally based on the numerouscellular reactions to be in steady state with respect to theexternal fluxes on the cell boundary. The essence of this"steady state" approach is the identification of all thereaction rates (fluxes), both external and internal to the...

nanoHUB.org, a resource for nanoscience and nanotechnology, is supported by the National Science Foundation and other funding agencies. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.