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Introduction to Carbon Nanotube Electronics

By Susan Sinnott

University of Florida

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    Subhodh Kumar Karkala

    4.0 out of 5 stars

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    Azhar Abbas Zaidi

    4.0 out of 5 stars

    Very brief and precise presentation about carbon nanotubes. Helped me establish a base of the subject. Worth recommending to friends.

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    Ventura Valverde Herrera

    5.0 out of 5 stars

    its very important in my education at level of postgraduate student, its very easily to understan

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    Boon

    5.0 out of 5 stars

    I agree with some reviewers that the data was straight to the point but yet too general. Also, it would help a ton for the listener to have voice and audio effects to add more charisma to the presentation.

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    Venkata Kranthi Kiran Cherukuri

    5.0 out of 5 stars

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    rabiaa

    5.0 out of 5 stars

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    Scott Warren

    5.0 out of 5 stars

    As always, I love when a module contains a pretest. This module also had a considerably more difficult pretest that gave a student less of a chance to substitute background knowledge for knowledge learned from the module – a good thing in my eyes. I especially like question nine, which asks something the student probably doesn\‘t remember, but can easily use the provided program to find out. In fact, that\‘s probably easier than clicking back through the slide show looking for it.

    The first impression from the slide show is that it goes much too quickly. Because the student must read them and understand at his own pace, is it possible to make the default setting to not play, but allow the student to navigate by the forward and backward buttons? This is easily done by pausing the player, but I feel bad for a student who didn\‘t realize this and is constantly fighting with the 5 second slider at the bottom of the viewer.

    I like slides two through six – the wordiness lends itself well to the mute slide show presentation. This introduction module has more words and explanation in general compared to the Nanofluidics module, and I think that\‘s a great improvement. With the longer explanations and pictures of different nanotube types (complete with the arrow pointing out the axis – a nice touch because that confused me for a bit when I first read about armchair and zigzag tubes), the whole slide show seems pretty straightforward until slide eleven.

    In eleven, I was confused for a moment. Is the graph showing the density of states for the discrete levels accurate for all nanotubes? That\‘s how the wording on the slide makes it sound, but then I have trouble seeing how the graph on slide eleven agrees with later graphs for metallic nanotubes.

    Twelve and thirteen both present graphs that are easy to read and provide good examples of \“what to look for\” in the different graphs that the student will make in the example. My only complaint is that I think it would have been best to use the same nanotubes in both slides. Both slides show a graph for a (7,0) nanotube, and the student can switch back and fourth between the slides to see how the graphs interact and get an idea for where the semiconductive properties come from. However, slide twelve uses a (6,0) metallic nanotube while thirteen uses a (5,5), so a student would be hesitent to look for coorelations between these graphs.

    The conclusion is solid and connects all of the information to the real world, touching on modern research and the future. Very nice.

    The paper and the slideshow clearly have a lot in common. One compliment I have is that the paper provided in the learning module more clearly describes what the lattice indices mean that any of the books I\‘ve tried to look this up in. The expanded explanation of the graphs in the paper is also very helpful. I also appreciate the brief explanation of the sharp spikes in the DOS vs Energy graphs. Overall, the paper nicely filled in the holes left by the slide show, though I\‘m still a little unsure about slide eleven\‘s graph of energy vs. DOS. Why does a paper written in 2004 refer to innovations expected in 2003?

    The exercise provided with the learning module is much friendlier and more comprehensible than the nanofluidics module\‘s example. I could easily see and apply the information from the learning module while performing the exercise, and as I said before it helped on the final quiz!

    My last comment is that, while taking the final quiz, I noticed that, unlike in the nanofluidics module, there was no explanation as to why an answer was correct. Between the two modules, I found a couple times that I knew the answer, but wasn\‘t sure of how to best explain the answer.

    Over all, I really liked this module. I thought that it easily facilitated learning and that I gained a lot of information about key concepts, both about nanotubes in general and about their electrical properties. As I was proofreading these comments before submitting them, I noticed two words over and over: nanotube, and explanation. Most importantly, this module really does a nice job explaining what is going on inside of those crazy nanotubes and why they do some of the things they do. That makes it an A+ work in my book.

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    Krishna Madhavan

    4.0 out of 5 stars

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    SeongJun Heo

    5.0 out of 5 stars

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    Hamidreza Hashempour

    4.0 out of 5 stars

    Nice one. A bit too simplistic.

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