Support

Support Options

Submit a Support Ticket

 

Piezoelectric Transducers: Strain Sensing and Energy Harvesting (and Frequency Tuning)

By Toshikazu Nishida

University of Florida

Published on

Bio

Toshikazu (Toshi) Nishida Toshikazu (Toshi) Nishida is currently an associate professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) and an Affiliate Associate Professor in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (MAE) at the University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida. He is a founding member of the Interdisciplinary Microsystems Group at the University of Florida. His research interests include solid-state physical sensors and actuators, transducer noise, strained semiconductor devices, and reliability physics of semiconductor devices. He and his students are currently investigating strain effects in piezoresistive microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) transducers and advanced CMOS devices, noise mechanisms in piezoresistive MEMS transducers, MEMS piezoelectric transducers for vibrational energy reclamation, MEMS capacitive microphones, and biomedical applications of MEMS.

He received his Ph.D. (1988) and M.S. degrees in Electrical and Computer engineering and B.S. degree in Engineering physics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. With colleagues and students, he has received three best paper awards. He also received the 2003 College of Engineering Teacher of the Year award. He holds four U.S. patents.

Cite this work

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

  • Toshikazu Nishida (2007), "Piezoelectric Transducers: Strain Sensing and Energy Harvesting (and Frequency Tuning)," http://nanohub.org/resources/2575.

    BibTex | EndNote

Time

Location

Birck Nanotechnology Center, Room 2001

Tags

nanoHUB.org, a resource for nanoscience and nanotechnology, is supported by the National Science Foundation and other funding agencies. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.