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Multi-gate Nanowire FET

By Mincheol Shin

KAIST, Daejeon, Korea

3D simulator for silicon nanowire field effect transistors with multiple gates

Launch Tool

This tool version is unpublished and cannot be run. If you would like to have this version staged, you can put a request through HUB Support.

Archive Version 1.1
Published on 29 Nov 2007, unpublished on 29 Nov 2007
Latest version: 1.6.1. All versions

doi:10.4231/D3X63B48H cite this

This tool is closed source.

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Abstract

The silicon nanowire field effect transistors with multiple gates around the silicon channel that can significantly improve the gate control are considered to be promising candidates for the next generation transistors. In addition to effective suppression of short channel effects, the transistors show excellent current drive and they are also compatible with conventional CMOS processes.

This tool simulates the silicon nanowire field effect transistors (FETs) with multiple gates, such as Gate-all-around, double, tri, pi, and omega gates. The simulator features include 1) effective-mass theory, 2) uncoupled mode-space non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF), 3) Poisson-transport self-consistent calculation, and 4) quantum ballistic transport. Only NMOS type can be simulated as of now. For the uncoupled mode-space NEGF applied to the nanowire FETs, please refer to the paper by J. Wang et. al. (J. Appl. Phys. 96, 2192, 2004). Users can also refer to the "NanoWireFet" tool on nanoHUB.

Detailed numerical schemes employed in this tool can be found in "Efficient Simulation of Silicon Nanowire Field Effect Transistors and their Scaling Behavior", Mincheol Shin, to be published in J. Appl. Phys. (2006) and "Three Dimensional Quantum Simulation of Multigate Nanowire Field Effect Transistors", Mincheol Shin, which has been submitted to Mathematics and Computers in Simulation (2006), both of which can be downloaded from our web site.

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