A Conversation with Roald Hoffmann on Research, Teaching and Engagement in the 21st Century Land Grant University

By Roald Hoffmann

Cornell University, Ithaca, NY

Published on

Abstract

It is usually argued that research enhances the quality of teaching. I prefer to think that the two are inseparable. My arguments for emphasizing teaching in a research university come from two perspectives. The first is philosophical — what constitutes understanding? The second is operational — teaching naturally enhances one’s ability (my ability, at least) to explain and to do research. Provost Jay Akridge will conduct a fireside chat with Professor Hoffmann following the talk and discuss the intimate connections between the three dimensions of a land grant university.

Bio

Roald Hoffmann

Roald Hoffmann is a renowned researcher, teacher, and author from Cornell University, where he is the Frank H. T. Rhodes Professor of Humane Letters, Emeritus. As a researcher, he has received many honors, including the 1981 Nobel Prize in Chemistry (shared with Kenichi Fukui). As a teacher, he focused on introductory chemistry and reaching out to the general public. His television course, “The World of Chemistry," first aired on PBS in 1990. As a writer, Hoffmann has carved out a land between science, poetry, and philosophy, through many essays, five non-fiction books, three plays and five published collections of poetry.

 

Sponsored by

Lundstrom-Datta Seminar Series

Cite this work

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

  • Roald Hoffmann (2019), "A Conversation with Roald Hoffmann on Research, Teaching and Engagement in the 21st Century Land Grant University," http://nanohub.org/resources/30297.

    BibTex | EndNote

Time

Location

Fowler Hall, Stewart Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN

Tags