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Nanomaterials: Quantum Dots, Nanowires and Nanotubes

By Timothy D. Sands

Purdue University

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    Andrew Gibson

    5.0 out of 5 stars

    An excellent lecture, the interactive style really helps the student get more out of it, more lecturers should adopt this approach as it aids learning instead of focusing on teaching. Complex ideas are explained very well, and Tim’s areas of research are very exciting. I recommend listening to this with headphones as it makes the questions from the audience easier to hear. Slight criticism, some of the question on the slides are not answered on the audio and others are not in sync. But otherwise well deserving of an excellent rating.

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    sss 1983

    4.0 out of 5 stars

    good. however there is little talk about the quantum dot though in the nomenclature it says \“Nanomaterials: Quantum Dots, Nanowires and Nanotubes\”.

    it would have been better if there were some information relating to the different growth mechanisms about these nanoparticles.

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    Mario Cyril Pinto

    4.0 out of 5 stars

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    Eric R Waclawik

    5.0 out of 5 stars

    Prof Sands you have given your students an exciting and inspiring introduction to nanoscience. The lecture content was particulary strong in the definitions of a quantum dot and a nanowire. The slides on band structure were excellent introductions to electronics of solid state materials. I appreciate constructive critism now far more than gushing praise, so I will try to provide something (hopefully) constructive:

    The slides on Moore’s law near the end of the lecture were probably an unnecessary distraction. You’d already fired your students’ interest in the topic. If possible I might suggest concentrating a little more on the nature and role of holes, Coulombic attraction and the effective mass approximation – essentially Brus’ model of optical behaviour of a quantum dot to explain QD optical phenomena. You’ll probably need an extra lecture to do that well but I am sure your students can handle it!

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    Boon

    5.0 out of 5 stars

    Timothy gives the listener everything he wants know. I had much difficulty understanding even the basics of quantum mechanics before I went through this presentation.

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    Bao Lei

    3.0 out of 5 stars

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    steve hershman

    4.0 out of 5 stars

    5 if we could hear the questions better.

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    Archana Bahuguna

    5.0 out of 5 stars

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    satyadhar joshi

    5.0 out of 5 stars

    brillaint work keep it going please

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    abdulkadir

    5.0 out of 5 stars

    Mr. Sands is very helpful to students and explains the topic excitingly and clearly.

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    Scott Warren

    5.0 out of 5 stars

    This is easily my favorite lecture yet on the Nanohub website. I think it should be the first lecture in the Nanotechnology 101 series. It begins strong, introducing quantum dots and nanowires/tubes, and I especially like that this presentation explains *why* the nanoscale is so physically significant (lattice vibrations, how far electrons travel before scatter, possibility of defect free structures, etc). Far too many lectures just rely on \“smaller is better\” without giving any insight into the radical possibilities presented by this new technology. More than just being more physically accurate, I feel this approach allows the student to wonder and imagine new nano-ideas right off the bat.

    Your presentation on semiconductors versus conductors and insulators went down very smoothly and transitions nicely to electron particle/wave duality, which again flows perfectly into quantum confinement. The lecture doesn\‘t go too far into the examples at the end, but it does a fine job of touching many different bases.

    As an introductory lecture, I think that the presentation is almost perfect. More so than any other lecture I\‘ve seen (which is a lot), this explains \“why\” instead of just giving dispencing fact after fact. I appreciate the time you devoted to each topic, and I feel that I took more from this lecture than any other. The new understanding I\‘ve gained of conduction and quantum confinement will be especially useful in upcoming projects. Please keep up the excellent work.

    My only criticism is that the speaker doesn\‘t restate questions from the audience. As it is very difficult to hear the people asking questions, this detracts from the Q&A sections throughout the lecture.

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    jessica margolin

    5.0 out of 5 stars

    Clear 101-level lecture

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    sundar k iyer

    4.0 out of 5 stars

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