Support

Support Options

Submit a Support Ticket

 

BJT Lab

By Saumitra Raj Mehrotra1, Abhijeet Paul1, Gerhard Klimeck1, Dragica Vasileska2, Gloria Wahyu Budiman1

1. Purdue University 2. Arizona State University

This tool simulates a Bipolar Junction Transistor (BJT) using a 2D mesh. Powered by PADRE.

Launch Tool

You must login before you can run this tool.

Version 2.4 - published on 23 Aug 2010

doi:10.4231/D39G5GD2S cite this

This tool is closed source.

First-Time User Guide View All Supporting Documents

Structure Input deck Discrete BJT Input deck Minority Carrier characteristics Gummel Plot for npn Carrier concentrations under saturation Output Characteristics for npn BJT

Category

Tools

Published on

Abstract

A bipolar junction transistor (BJT) is a three-terminal device constructed of doped semiconductor material and may be used in amplifying or switching applications. Bipolar transistors are so named because their operation involves both electrons and holes. Although a small part of the transistor current is due to the flow of majority carriers, most of the transistor current is due to the flow of minority carriers, and so BJTs are classified as “minority-carrier” devices.


This tool allows Bipolar Junction Transistor (BJT) simulation using a 2D mesh. It allows the user to simulate an npn- or pnp- type of device in common-emitter and common-base configurations. Users can specify the Emitter, Base and Collector region depths and doping densities. Also, the material and minority carrier lifetimes can be specified by the user.

Typical simulation run time LINEAR: ~ 2 minutes


Typical simulation run time DISCRETE: ~ 4 minutes


If you want to know more about the physics of the operation of BJT plese refer to the following slides:


BJT Operation Description


Example Problems for BJT:

BJT Theoretical Exercise


h-parameters calculation

BJT tool wish list :

Upgrading to include HBT simulations.


Improvements / modifications in subsequent version releases:

Powered by

PADRE (Pisces And Device REplacement) developed by Mark Pinto & Kent Smith at AT&T Bell Labs.

Sponsored by

NCN@Purdue

Cite this work

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

  • Saumitra Raj Mehrotra; Abhijeet Paul; Gerhard Klimeck; Dragica Vasileska; Gloria Wahyu Budiman (2010), "BJT Lab," http://nanohub.org/resources/bjt. (DOI: 10.4231/D39G5GD2S).

    BibTex | EndNote

Tags

nanoHUB.org, a resource for nanoscience and nanotechnology, is supported by the National Science Foundation and other funding agencies. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.