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Selected Properties of Carbon Nanostructures: from Exotic Fullerenes to Nanotubes

By Manfred M. Kappes

Universität Karlsruhe (TH)

Published on

Abstract

The talk presents results from ongoing projects in the field of carbon
nanostructures: (i) Mass selected ion beam soft-landing has been used
to generate exotic fullerene materials comprising covalent linked,
non-IPR cages. Apart from microscopic structure, we have studied
thermal and electronic properties as well as reactivity towards
(atomic) hydrogen. (ii) Confocal fluorescence microscopy was applied
to the near-infrared emission properties of individual semiconducting
single-walled carbon nanotubes subject to external perturbations such
as unaxial strain, torsion as well as interaction with surfaces,
sourrounding dielectrics and other nanotubes.

Bio

Manfred Kappes
Full Professor. Physical Chemistry of Microscopic
Systems. Born 1957; B.Sc. 1977, Concordia University,
Montreal, Canada; Ph.D. 1981, Massachusetts Institute
of Technology, Cambridge, USA; Postdoctoral Fellow
1981-87, Universiät Bern, Switzerland; Habilitation
1987, Bern; Assistant and Associate Professor 1987-
1991, Northwestern University, Evanston, USA.

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Cite this work

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

  • Manfred M. Kappes (2008), "Selected Properties of Carbon Nanostructures: from Exotic Fullerenes to Nanotubes," http://nanohub.org/resources/4206.

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Time

Location

Pancoe ENH - Abbott Auditorium, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL

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