Please help us continue to improve nanoHUB operation and service by completing our survey - http://bit.ly/nH-survey14. Thank you - we appreciate your time. close

Support

Support Options

Submit a Support Ticket

 

Some Important Aspects of the Chemistry of Nanomaterials

By C.N.R. Rao

Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Bangalore, India

Published on

Abstract

Keynote address for the launch of the Center for Analytical Instrumentation Development at Purdue University.

Bio

C.N.R. Rao Professor C.N.R. Rao is the National Research Professor and Linus Pauling Research Professor and Honorary President of Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Bangalore, India. Also Distinguished Visiting Professor, Department of Materials, University of California, Santa Barbara. Prof. Rao is the past President of The Academy of Sciences for the Developing World (TWAS) with its office located in Trieste, Italy and is Chairman of the Scientific Advisory Council to the Prime Minister.

Professor C.N.R. Rao is a fellow of 20 science academies. He has the unique honor of being a Fellow/Member of all the major academies of the world including: The Royal Society, UK; National Academy of Sciences, USA; Russian Academy of Sciences; Pontifical Academy of Sciences; French Academy of Sciences; and Japan Academy. He received his Ph.D. degree from Purdue University in 1958 and an honorary degree from Purdue University in 1982.

Sponsored by

Cite this work

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

  • C.N.R. Rao (2008), "Some Important Aspects of the Chemistry of Nanomaterials," http://nanohub.org/resources/4838.

    BibTex | EndNote

Time

Location

Burton Morgan Building, Room 121, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN

Tags

nanoHUB.org, a resource for nanoscience and nanotechnology, is supported by the National Science Foundation and other funding agencies. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.