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Quantum Mechanics: Postulates

By Dragica Vasileska1, Gerhard Klimeck2

1. Arizona State University 2. Purdue University

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Abstract

A physical system is generally described by three basic ingredients: states; observables; and dynamics (or law of time evolution) or, more generally, a group of physical symmetries. A classical description can be given in a fairly direct way by a phase space model of mechanics: states are points in a symplectic phase space, observables are real-valued functions on it, time evolution is given by a one-parameter group of symplectic transformations of the phase space, and physical symmetries are realized by symplectic transformations. A quantum description consists of a Hilbert space of states, observables are self adjoint operators on the space of states, time evolution is given by a one-parameter group of unitary transformations on the Hilbert space of states, and physical symmetries are realized by unitary transformations. The postulates of quantum mechanics are outlined in the provided reading material listed below. Also provided to the user is a homework assignment related to this material.

  • Postulates of Quantum Mechanics
  • Homework Assignment
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    Cite this work

    Researchers should cite this work as follows:

    • www.eas.asu.edu/~vasilesk
    • Dragica Vasileska; Gerhard Klimeck (2008), "Quantum Mechanics: Postulates," http://nanohub.org/resources/4923.

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    In This Series

    1. Reading Material: Postulates of Quantum Mechanics

      07 Jul 2008 | Teaching Materials | Contributor(s): Dragica Vasileska

      www.eas.asu.edu

    2. Homework Assignment: Postulates of Quantum Mechanics

      07 Jul 2008 | Teaching Materials | Contributor(s): Dragica Vasileska, Gerhard Klimeck

      www.eas.asu.edu/~vasileskNSF

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