Friday morning October 31, nanoHUB tools and home directories will be unavailable from 6 AM to noon (eastern time); we're getting a new file server! All tool sessions will be lost.

Support

Support Options

Submit a Support Ticket

 

ECE 606: Principles of Semiconductor Devices

By Muhammad A. Alam

Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN

Category

Courses

Published on

Abstract

In the last 50 years, solid state devices like transistors have evolved from an interesting laboratory experiment to a technology with applications in all aspects of modern life. Making transistors is a complex process that requires unprecedented collaboration among material scientists, solid state physicists, chemists, numerical analysts, and software professionals. And yet, as you will see in part 1 of this course (first 5 weeks), that the basics of current flow though solid state semiconductor devices can be understood by using some elementary concepts of quantum- and statistical-mechanics. In Part 2 (next 5 weeks), we will use this framework to analyze bipolar-transistors (Shockley, 1953). And in Part 3 (last 5 weeks), we will do the same for MOSFETs (Grove, 1967). Although much have changed in the last 30 years - transistors have gotten smaller, MEMS have become an important research area, and cross-disciplinary research in nano-bio-electronic systems is flourishing - yet the simple but powerful concepts that you will learn in this introductory course will still provide you the background and a reference point for all your future research work ( I will give you examples of such new applications as we go along).

Course Website
Duscussion Q & A Website

image

Bio

Muhammad Ashraful Alam Professor Alam joined Purdue University as a faculty member of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department in 2004 after spending nearly a decade in industry, first at Bell Labs and then at Agere Systems. His research interest involves physics of carrier transport in semiconductor devices, and he has worked on theory of electron transport models, quasi-ballistic transport in bipolar transistors, MOCVD and ALD crystal growth, laser dynamics, and most recent recently, on the theory of oxide reliability, transport in nanocomposite materials, and response of Nano-Bio sensors.

References

Kermit Sigmon, MATLAB Primer, Second Edition

Cite this work

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

  • Muhammad A. Alam (2008), "ECE 606: Principles of Semiconductor Devices," http://nanohub.org/resources/5749.

    BibTex | EndNote

Tags

See also

No results found.

Lecture Number/Topic Online Lecture Video Lecture Notes Supplemental Material Suggested Exercises
ECE 606 Lecture 1: Introduction View HTML
View Flash
View Notes
ECE 606 Lecture 2: Geometry of Periodic Crystals View HTML
View Flash
View Notes
ECE 606 Lecture 3: Elements of Quantum Mechanics View HTML
View Flash
View Notes
ECE 606 Lecture 4: Solution of Schrodinger Equation View HTML
View Flash
View Notes
ECE 606 Lecture 5: Energy Bands View HTML
View Flash
View Notes
ECE 606 Lecture 6: Energy Bands (continued) View HTML
View Flash
View Notes
ECE 606 Lecture 7: Energy Bands in Real Crystals View HTML
View Flash
View Notes
ECE 606 Lecture 8: Density of States View HTML
View Flash
View Notes
ECE 606 Lecture 9: Fermi-Dirac Statistics View HTML
View Flash
View Notes
ECE 606 Lecture 10: Additional Information View HTML
View Flash
View Notes
ECE 606 Lecture 11: Equilibrium Statistics View HTML
View Flash
View Notes
ECE 606 Lecture 12: Equilibrium Concentrations View HTML
View Flash
View Notes
ECE 606 Lecture 13: Recombination-Generation View HTML
View Flash
View Notes
ECE 606 Lecture 13a: Fermi Level Differences for Metals and Semiconductors View
ECE 606 Lecture 14: Bulk Recombination View HTML
View Flash
View Notes
ECE 606 Lecture 15: Surface Recombination/Generation View HTML
View Flash
View Notes
ECE 606 Lecture 16: Carrier Transport View HTML
View Flash
View Notes
ECE 606 Lecture 17: Hall Effect, Diffusion View HTML
View Flash
View Notes
ECE 606 Lecture 18: Continuity Equations View HTML
View Flash
View Notes
ECE 606 Lecture 19: Numerical Solution of Transport Equation View HTML
View Flash
View Notes
ECE 606 Lecture 20: Electrostatics of P-N Junction Diodes View HTML
View Flash
View Notes
ECE 606 Lecture 21: P-N Diode I-V Characteristics View HTML
View Flash
View Notes
ECE 606 Lecture 22: Non-ideal Effects View HTML
View Flash
View Notes
ECE 606 Lecture 23: AC Response View HTML
View Flash
View Notes
ECE 606 Lecture 24: Large Signal Response View HTML
View Flash
View Notes
ECE 606 Lecture 25: Schottky Diode I View HTML
View Flash
View Notes
ECE 606 Lecture 26: Schottky Diode II View HTML
View Flash
View Notes
ECE 606 Lecture 27: Introduction to Bipolar Transistors View HTML
View Flash
View Notes
ECE 606 Lecture 28: BJT Design I View HTML
View Flash
View Notes
ECE 606 Lecture 29: BJT Design II View HTML
View Flash
View Notes
ECE 606 Lecture 30: Heterojunction Bipolar Transistors I View HTML
View Flash
View Notes
ECE 606 Lecture 31: Heterojunction Bipolar Transistors II View HTML
View Flash
View Notes
ECE 606 Lecture 32: MOS Electrostatics I View HTML
View Flash
View Notes
ECE 606 Lecture 33: MOS Electrostatics II View HTML
View Flash
View Notes
ECE 606 Lecture 34: MOSCAP Frequency Response View HTML
View Flash
View Notes
ECE 606 Lecture 35: MOSFET I-V Characteristics I View HTML
View Flash
View Notes
ECE 606 Lecture 36: MOSFET I-V Characteristics II View HTML
View Flash
View Notes
ECE 606 Lecture 37a: Nonideal Effects in MOSFET I View HTML
View Flash
View Notes
ECE 606 Lecture 37b: Nonideal Effects in MOSFET II View HTML
View Flash
View Notes
ECE 606 Lecture 38: Modern MOSFET View HTML
View Flash
View Notes
ECE 606 Lecture 39: Reliability of MOSFET View HTML
View Flash
View Notes
ECE 606 Lecture 40: Looking Back and Looking Forward View HTML
View Flash
View Notes

nanoHUB.org, a resource for nanoscience and nanotechnology, is supported by the National Science Foundation and other funding agencies. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.