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DragonflyTV Nano – Using the Power of Television to Introduce Middle School Children to Nanotechnology

By Richard Hudson1, Joan Freese1, Angie Prindle1, Lisa Regalla1

1. TPT-Twin Cities Public Television, St. Paul, MN

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    Tanya Faltens

    5.0 out of 5 stars

    I LOVE the Dragonfly TV (DFTV) nano series, and it was such a pleasure to see this video that shows some of the people and ideas behind the show. You’ll hear about the creation of their scope and sequence, and what partners they worked with to develop it. There are clips from DFTV nano to give you a flavor of what lies within the whole series. You will hear how they met the challenge of turning these complex concepts into an engaging story. You will also learn about: * How scientists from University partners helped them with their scientific investigations. * The secret of the soda pop and rocks explosion kit. * Scientist profiles to show how cool it would be to be a scientist, and what they do for hobbies outside the lab. * The idea of bio-mimicry or bio-inspiration. * How they adapted the idea from “Shapes of the Invisible” to a middle school audience, and created the Zoom Cab. * How they address concerns about nano technology via the What Kids Think About Nano segments. * An introduction to the www.dragonflytv.org website and the other educational materials that they created. * Where kids can find ideas of what experiments they can do at home. * Interactive Online games for nanotechnology: NanoBots. * Kids ‘Zine * NSTA insert in Dec. 2008 Science Scope * and more! * The careful conceptual framework that this series is built upon really helps it all fit together, and they are successful in creating materials that engage the middle school audience. (I’ve seen a few too many animations and other materials on nanoscience that do not have a clear target audience, or that miss the target, or that contain things that I would not want to share with students, for fear of creating serious misconceptions.)

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