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Understanding Carbon Nanotubes

By Christian Martinez

University of Texas at El Paso

Published on

Abstract

Faculty Advisor(s): Melloch, Reifenberger, Guo

Nanotechnology is a recent area which covers almost every educational field. Nowadays, most people are unaware of the benefits of nanotechnology. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are structures that are found and used in nanotechnology. These CNTs are nanostructures of desire among researchers because of their excellent intrinsic physical properties and promising potential applications in almost every field. A better understanding of CNTs will let us teach as well as reach the average person as well as elementary through high school students about these interesting yet unfamiliar nanostructures. Carbon nanotubes are introduced in the simplest yet instructive method in a colorful website where people can navigate/browse easily. In this website, properties, growth procedures, and applications of CNTs are explained using a variety of pictures as well as colorful characters that aid the person to familiarize with these fascinating structures. The characters explain using analogies as relating a carbon nanotube to a human hair, where the carbon nanotube is 10,000 times much smaller than a human hair. Furthermore, the website contains links that helps the person to understand what nanotechnology is in a gentle yet educative approach.

Cite this work

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

  • (2004), "Understanding Carbon Nanotubes," http://nanohub.org/resources/736.

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Time

Location

Fu Room, Potter Building, Room 234 <br /> Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN

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