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Educating by Computer Animations One Method Proposed to Control Motion at the Nanoscale: How to Roll

By Manuel Emeric

University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras

Published on

Abstract

Faculty Advisor(s): Melloch, Reifenberger, Guo

Educating by Computer Animations One Method Proposed to Control Motion at the Nanoscale: How to Roll a Bucky Ball Through a Crystal Surface

A student oriented approach for teaching was used to develop an explanation about the method to control motion at the nanoscale. The approach is focused on teaching all kind of people, no matter its previous knowledge about science. The devices developed at the nanoscale, as most nanotechnology, are a not well known subject for most people. Most of the past courses about nanotechnology, were possible to university science students only.

The educational methods used are 2D simple drawings animated for descriptive explanations of conceptual knowledge. The movements are accompanied by voice and written words at the computer screen. The subject discussed is the proposed method on how to roll a bucky ball trough the surface of an ionic crystal. Since the method was never been experimentally proved, the concept is explained in theory by using simply explained physics laws. Each definition used is explained from scratch. The animation will be available as a web page linked to the main LSPM team nanotechnology page.

Cite this work

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

  • Manuel Emeric (2004), "Educating by Computer Animations One Method Proposed to Control Motion at the Nanoscale: How to Roll," http://nanohub.org/resources/737.

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Time

Location

Fu Room, Potter Building, Room 234 <br /> Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN

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