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SURI 2004 Program Highlights

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Abstract

2004 SURI Students The 2004 SURI class consisted of 22 students from 13 different universities.
Alabama A&M University
Arizona State University
Cal Poly
Morgan State University
National Polytech Institute Of Toulouse
University of Michigan
Purdue University
Norfolk State
Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico
University of Puerto Rico-Mayaguez
University of Puerto Rico-Rio Piedras
Penn State University
University of Texas El Paso (UTEP)

2004 Summer Institute Activities

Short Course on Nano-Transistors - Prof. Datta et al.

Supriyo

Professor Supriyo Datta of the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering taught a short course on nano-transitors. This course consisted of 6 one-hour lectures during the course of the summer.

Molecular Conduction Workshop

Audience
Audience
Audience
Audience

The INAC/NCN has held two workshops on molecular conduction. The purpose of this workshop is to bring engineers and scientists together in an informal workshop environment to discuss this important aspect of nanotechnology. Another purpose of holding this workshop is tso the SURIs can experience a technical meeting and see how engineers and scientist interact at a professional meeting.

The second workshop was held at Northwestern University July 8-10, 2004 and had 125 attendees. We anticipate holding the third annual workshop at Purdue the summer of 2005.

More info on the workshop...

Nanotechnology 101 - Prof. Lundstrom

Transistors 101
Transistors 101

Professor Mark Lundstrom of the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering presented two lectures on how transistors and CMOS operate to the SURIs.

More info on these lectures...

Professional Development Seminars

A number of professional development seminars/discussion sessions were held for the SURIs. These included topics such as, "How to Select and Apply to Graduate School?", "Scientific Ethics", and "Project design/teamwork".

End-of-Project Bulge - Prof. Eaton

Eaton
Class

Professor Jim Eaton is a retired engineer who is now a visiting professor at Purdue. He holds a number of seminars/discussion sessions with the SURI. Pictured is the "End-of-Project Bulge" seminar where project planning and the inevitable all-out-effort needed at the end of a project to meet the deadline.

Danger to Your Team - Prof. Eaton

Eaton
Class

Professor Eaton and the "Danger-to-your-Team" discussion session. This session deals with teamwork and discussion of attributes of team members.

Multidisciplinary Approach to Problem Solving - Prof. Savage

Hirsch

Professor Bonnie Savage of the School of Civil Engineering discussing Multidisciplinary Approaches to Problem Solving with the SURIs.

Scientific Ethics - Prof. Hirsch

Hirsch

Professor Andrew Hirsch is the head of the Physics Department at Purdue. He teaches a course on Science and Society. Pictured is Prof. Hirsch discussing Scientific Fraud with the SURIs. Prof. Hirsch presented a number of case studies. As an example of deliberate fraud, he presented the recent case of Jan Schon at Bell Laboratories. He presented the case of Renee Bondlott and N-rays, for the case of self-deception. For the dangers of publishing in the news media when peer-reviewed journals would not accept one's work, he presented the case of cold fusion. He presented the case of the discovery of element 118 at Livermore Laboratories, for the case of a research team being deceived by one individual on a team.

Where Do Project Breakthroughs Come From - Prof. Eaton

Eaton
Class

Class

Professor Eaton and his seminar on "Where Product Breakthroughs Come From." Professor Eaton uses two case studies, the invention of the Scanning Tunneling Microscope and the design of the first scientific calculator, the HP 35. Professor Eaton was a member of the HP 35 design team.

Selecting and Applying to Graduate School

Eaton

Professor Balakhrisnan discussing "selecting a graduate school" and "applying to graduate school" with the SURIs. Professor Balakhrisnan was the director of graduate admissions in Electrical and Computer Engineering and shared his insights from viewing thousands of applications for graduate school. Professor Balakhrisnan also discussed the sources of funding available for graduate school-teaching assistantships, research assistantships, and fellowships-and how to go about obtaining funding.

Technical Writing and Presentation

Eaton
Eaton
Eaton
Eaton

Coordinated with the SURIs' research project was a technical writing/presentation course. The first task for the SURIs was to write a literature review for their research project. The culmination of the SURIs' research and the technical writing/presentation course was a two-day conference at the end of the program where all the SURIs presented the results of their summer research. The SURIs wrote abstracts for their conference presentation just as is done for consideration for presentation at a professional conference. The SURIs' abstracts are "published" on this website. This posting of the abstracts on our web site simulates the issues involved with submitting work for publication.

Ending Conference and Proceedings

The summer experience is concluded with a conference in which each student presents their work.

Eaton
Eaton
Eaton
Eaton

SURI 2004 Conference Proceedings

The culmination of the SURIs' research and the technical writing/presentation course was a two-day conference at the end of the program where all the SURIs presented the results of their summer research. The SURIs wrote abstracts for their conference presentation just as is done for consideration for presentation at a professional conference.

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Researchers should cite this work as follows:

  • (2004), "SURI 2004 Program Highlights," http://nanohub.org/resources/753.

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