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Hierarchical Physical Models for Analysis of Electrostatic Nanoelectromechanical Systems (NEMS)

By Narayan Aluru

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Published on

Abstract

This talk will introduce hierarchical physical models and efficient computational techniques for coupled analysis of electrical, mechanical and van der Waals energy domains encountered in NEMS. Numerical results will be presented for several silicon nanoelectromechanical switches to understand the static electromechanical pull-in behavior.

Bio

N. R. Aluru is currently an Associate Professor in the Department of Mechanical & Industrial Engineering at UIUC. He is also affiliated with the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and the Bioengineering Department at UIUC.

He received the B.E. degree with honors and distinction from the Birla Institute of Technology and Science (BITS), Pilani, India, in 1989, the M.S. degree from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY, in 1991, and the Ph.D. degree from Stanford University, Stanford, CA, in 1995. He was a Postdoctoral Associate at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, from 1995 to 1997. In 1998, he joined the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) as an Assistant Professor. He received the NSF CAREER award and the NCSA faculty fellowship in 1999, the 2001 CMES Distinguished Young Author Award, the Xerox Award and the Willett Faculty Scholar Award in 2002. He is a Subject Editor for the IEEE/ASME Journal of Microelectromechanical Systems, Associate Editor for the IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems II and serves on the Editorial Board of a number of other journals.

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Cite this work

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

  • Narayan Aluru (2006), "Hierarchical Physical Models for Analysis of Electrostatic Nanoelectromechanical Systems (NEMS)," http://nanohub.org/resources/850.

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Time

Location

MSEE 239, Purdue University

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