Reviews

Write a review

  1. 0 Like 0 Dislike

    Ren Li

    4.0 out of 5 stars

    Gene Fitzgerald, in this lecture, mainly focused on introduce the concept of innovation and give us a chance to have a glance of what the real innovation looks like. He asked us to focus on innovation, not start-ups. "Start-ups" is not equal to "innovation". Most start-ups are not innovative, though they are the newborn company for the market. This correct my wrong opinion. I always thought that start-ups play an important role in the innovation of the world. Now it seems that I was wrong. When I remember the companies like Google and Facebook, I realize that even though these huge company existing for many years, they are still active, innovative and full of youth.

    Why we should focus on innovation? The reason is in the following news. When the whole financial world encountered a crisis, there were still 30% MIT students hired by financial companies. This is quite shocking. In this way, innovation speaks for itself.

    When modeling the process of innovation in the real world, people usually uses a linear mode, technology to implementation then to market. Even though this is widely accepted, Gene Fitzgerald claims that this is actually wrong. The model of innovation process should be iterative not linear. We cannot first choose from infinite technology method, and then choose from infinite ways of implementation and finally produce a new product fro the market. So the linear model is not possible.

    This lecture is pretty good. Gene Fitzgerald has a good knowledge of how to use simple but proper figures, charts and tables to explain his ideas. The news and his true experience he referred in the lecture are all persuasive and strictly relevant to his opinion. The only thing that I am not satisfied is, he uses  the quotation, "useful embodiments of ideas in the marketplace", to explain what is innovation. This is too abstract for me to understand. I know it is not science and it is not invention, so it is what? This makes me really confused. I expect he can use some easy words for the explanation. 

    Reply Report abuse

    Please login to vote.

  2. 0 Like 0 Dislike

    Shahzad Hameedi

    5.0 out of 5 stars

    Sad to hear about Dr. Bagwell passing away! It's was pretty funny how Dr. Lundstrom introduced another Professor Dr. Jerry Woodall, who then finally introduced Professor Dr. Gene Fitzgerald for this lecture. 

    After this lecture, I will probably read Dr. Fitzgerald's book on Inside Real Innovation. Glad to hear that most of the investor banker because of their blunders. It is also interesting that 30% of MIT graduates in 2007 were in the financial sector. It is very interesting to hear that new engineers will have to focus on innovation because investors are weary about spending their assets on mechanisms.  

    I really like his idea of focusing on the innovation and not the start-ups. Another good book to read will be the illusions of entrepreneurship. It is very interesting that most people start a business due to the following four factors: Unemployment, working part-time, while changing jobs, and when they are making less money. I wonder if further your education would be a good addition to the list. 

    I particularly enjoyed his remarks about what is innovation, and how he relates it to "useful embodiments of ideas in the marketplace." His slide on slide on Linear Innovation Fallacy is interesting where he talks about how effects of historical recording, and how the philosopher Koon related this principle to oxygen. I agree with his statement that innovation now a days is linear and that's how humans think.

    I like his time illustration about how it takes about 10 to 15 year from fundamental innovation to be a first dollar earnings. However, fundamental innovation is what changes history is very powerful, and it is the key as per his talk. Focusing on choosing the right problem is so correct about the work, but I wish he would have given some more concrete examples for this.  

    I really liked his honesty about that he did his PhD because of the corporate influence. Gives a good guide for us to relate our work with Corporate America. Very realistic presentation!

    I love how they, Amberwave, were able to get Intel in a patent litigation. His conclusion about how to focus on your passion was very powerful, and how he equates chaos to opportunity. 

    Reply Report abuse

    Please login to vote.

  3. 0 Like 0 Dislike

    Sabarish Vettakkorumakankav Sridhar

    4.0 out of 5 stars

    In this presentation, Gene Fitzgerald talks about innovation and what it means to be an innovator. He starts of with the linear model of innovation and provides some explanation as to why he thinks it is something which he doesnt think is right. Instead he says that innovation is an iterative model and he provides an example by talking about his own startup and his personal experience.

     

    He brings out that the transactional experience is really important and is what makes a difference. He then explains the differences in the previous innovation model and why the innovation model is going to change very soon. In the beginning there was a close relation between the industry needs and the universities. However , in the new model he shows that universities are not as close to the market because they dont interact as closely with industries as they originally used to.

     

    In this model, we need to determine what kind of research is needed by the market. This means that whenever there is chaos there is an opportunity. He also talks about why he feels that the fundamental long term innovation is needed. The incremental innovation phase needs a long term innovation(which takes about 10-15 years ), and this is something which happens in the background. This is why often we use old and new technology combine to create innovation.

     

    The talk was very informative and interesting. It was a new approach to the entire process of innovation and helped me realize how closely the market and technology interact to drive research.  

    Reply Report abuse

    Please login to vote.

  4. 0 Like 0 Dislike

    Nikkitha Subbiah

    4.0 out of 5 stars

    The speaker talks about what innovation really means and what constitutes the process. I think anyone who is into research should watch this lecture as innovation might not always mean what one thinks it is. The point about how start-ups aren't the only ones involved in innovation and how big corporations actively participate in innovation is something we need to take into account when trying to find a job. Most times people think that no meaningful innovation is done in the industry and this misconception is being clarified in this lecture.

    The speaker also talks about the process involved in innovation and how even a small change in one of the following three would count towards innovation: marketplace,  implementation and technology. He also talks about how the co-ops between industries and Universities should increase. This is a good point and I think in the past seven years, this point has become even more evident and a more common practice. 

    Overall, the lecture what a very informative one which helped me realize that no matter where I end up, I can still stay true to innovation and make a change.

    Reply Report abuse

    Please login to vote.

  5. 0 Like 0 Dislike

    Xiao Hu

    4.0 out of 5 stars

    The main idea in this presentation is the innovation. Three elements that are relative to innovation are marketplace, technology, and implementation. Eugene detailly explained these relationships and inspired us to apply actions during our graduate school.

    This talk is very helpful for us when we are doing the research. Because creativity is a quality that we should have to do research. As he mentioned, “useful embodiments of ideas in the marketplace”, it is also relative to us when we finally will connect our knowledge with society.

    For the slide, the background color could be changed into white or black. I believe purple is a little bit attractive so that audience will not focus on the material on the slides. Also, there are some slides contains too much text information (Last three slides). Nevertheless, the diagrams, pipeline demo, and visual information used in the slides are fantastic. Especially the pipelines, they are easy to understand and helpful.

    Overall it has a 4/5 score.

    Reply Report abuse

    Please login to vote.

  6. 0 Like 0 Dislike

    Roland N Green

    5.0 out of 5 stars

    Gene Fitzgerald's presentation on "Inside Real Innovation" provided real insight on how I should be approaching my research. He brings up the point of a focus on innovation instead of start-ups, as innovation does not necessarily come from these companies, and can also come from corporations. He speaks to the point that start-ups are genrally low-tech, which goes against what I had in my mind when thinking of silicon valley-type start-ups.

    Innovation not being invention or science was another thought that Gene brings up in his presentation that I had not considered. He defines it more as "useful embodiments of ideas in the marketplace," which led me to redefine what perception was on companies and the prodcuts that they introduce to the public.

    I particularly enjoyed Gene's thoughts on the "Iterative Innovation Process" where he describes how intertwined technologies are, and how they are mixed to create new products. How this relates to the needs and wants of the market was also something that I had thought about, but not in the context that these markets have certain uncertanties that effect both technology and implementation from the beginning of the process.

    Overall, I feel that the presentation gave me a unique look into the "Endless Frontier" of innovation. I feel that the presentation could have been improved by including more examples of how this non-linear innovation process works, and how it is employed by companies today.  

    Reply Report abuse

    Please login to vote.

  7. 0 Like 0 Dislike

    Yeshani Wijesekara

    4.0 out of 5 stars

    Title of the talk is Inside Real Innovation. He starts by introducing some concepts about innovation, the way that it is today, then shows the progress of it through the years and use it to reflect about where we are today. As students it is important for us, specially in a time with drastic changes, to be involved in innovation and being a part of the challenges.

    I like how he draws examples from past to discuss how capital was trying to find a place to invest in but couldn’t. Then focusses on why couldn’t the innovation pipeline couldn’t provide a path for investments.

    He discusses the differences between innovation and start ups and the need to focus on innovations in the market place. He talks about the perception of entrepreneurship – the statistics/demographics.

    Innovation isn’t invention or science. He defines it as “Useful embodiment of ideas in the marketplace”, and models it linearly and as an iterative process. I understand how modelling makes it easier for us to understand problems. However, in this scenario, it would have also been nice to know how these models were used to tighten the gap between capital and innovation.

    Overall it was a good lecture. It was also nice to hear about his time as a graduate student, and how he uses that as an example to model the innovation process. This gives a perspective on how individuals can contribute to something larger and gives a perspective on how real innovation works.

     

     

    Reply Report abuse

    Please login to vote.

  8. 0 Like 0 Dislike

    Vichitha Kekanaje Chinmaya

    3.0 out of 5 stars

     

    The session helped me understand that innovation is the “Useful embodiments of ideas in the market place”. The innovation process is an iterative procedure involving going back and forth between the different aspects of market, between old and new technological ideas, and the efficient implementation methods. The going back and forth between the 3 aspects (technological aspect marked with purple bubbles, market aspects marked with red bubbles and implementation aspects marked with green bubbles) is called a transactional experience. The gap or the distance between the 3 aspects is supposed to minimize over time and finally overlap with each other to call the process a successful innovation. Gene Fitzgerald also gives states several insightful aspects and terms that are related to innovation and research.  His own experience of innovating the “Strained Silicon Technology” which went through several rigorous rounds of development between the academia, big semiconductor corporations and startups is inspiring. He then talks about the old and new innovation pipeline models and speaks about the disparity between the two. The new innovation model has lead to a lot of unrelated research piling on with less sense of direction or purpose compared to the previous innovation model.

     

    The overall session gave me a very practical insight into what goes into innovation. However, the quality of visuals could have been made better with more legible slides.

    Reply Report abuse

    Please login to vote.

  9. 0 Like 0 Dislike

    Daniel Mas Montserrat

    4.0 out of 5 stars

    This is a good lecture where it presents some ideas about innovation and its relationship with the industry. The talk starts by presenting the steps of innovation and it introduces some useful experiences. The speaker presents the three main pillars of innovation: the technology, the implementation and the market place. It explains the relationship between the pillars and how they evolve form a big idea to a narrow market. This process can take between 10 to 15 years. The lecturer introduces the relationship between industry and academia when it comes to innovation and it tackles aspects like competition, intellectual property or looking for funding.

    This lecture is interesting and dynamic. It is easy to understand and it could be teacher to non engineers. Maybe the use of visuals could be improved by make in the slides more readable. 

    Reply Report abuse

    Please login to vote.

  10. 0 Like 0 Dislike

    Jialiang Yu

    4.0 out of 5 stars

    This is an interesting seminar. The speaker introduced the concept of innovation and the truth behind scene. An innovation idea has three aspects, which are technology, implementation and marketplace. Sometimes the innovation process takes years from forming the idea to really making profit in marketplace. The three aspects are not independent, they are interactive with each other. The speaker also gives examples about the innovation pipeline. Now the cooperation between industry and academic institution becomes more important in producing the real innovation. There are also problems in the process of innovation, such as lack of funding, competition and intellectual property preservation. The lack of insight into future is also the restrict for innovation. From this lecture, I better understand the process of innovation. After connected my own experience when I worked for a startup company, I found the speaker really lead me to a deeper understanding how a innovative company should work like.In all, I like this lecture.

     

    Reply Report abuse

    Please login to vote.

  11. 0 Like 0 Dislike

    Rasika Kalwit

    5.0 out of 5 stars

    In the whole series, I found this seminar most interesting. Most of the time students get confused between innovation and invention. The presenter explained both invention and innovation processes and what goes on behind the scene.  The innovation idea can be formed using three different aspects, technology, implementation and marketplace. The timeline for the innovation process is interesting and it can takes years to even form a basic idea and it’s an iterative process which can take longer to actually realize. The presenter gives realistic scenario about the innovation pipeline where most of the research is done by big corporations but now, industry academic co-operative work should be emphasized more for producing real innovation. The presenter also talks about problems faced in the process of innovation such as lack of funding, competition and intellectual property preservation. Overall, it’s a really engaging seminar.

    Reply Report abuse

    Please login to vote.

  12. 0 Like 0 Dislike

    Sarvesh Vijay Pradhan

    3.0 out of 5 stars

    Overall a good seminar focused on what goes into the 'innovation' pipeline and some thoughts on why innovation is suffering today. The talk is divided into defining the innovation pipeline and a description of the experiences of the Speaker along that pipeline. I found the talk difficult to follow until the example was explained and is largely the reason I give this three stars. The spoken experiences give meaning to the pipeline and remove ambiguity in the contribution of each stage. I would urge viewers to stay with the talk until the example is detailed.

    The Speaker defines 'innovation' as research that is translated into a product to be consumed by the market place. Only when the product is tangible, consumed and purchased by the marketplace is the innovation considered 'real'. To this end the Speaker defines a synergy between three pillars, the technology, the implementation and the marketplace. The implementation is the physical realization of the product while takes into account the limitations of manufacturing process or supply chain etc. All three pillars narrow as the time spent on the innovation increases; from a big idea to a narrow market to a specific manufacturing technique. The time to a real innovation is put at 10-15 years.

    The model of innovation described helped define a thought framework of how to approach innovation as an individual. It also defines the need for partners who understand the pillars and are willing to speak across pillars. Further the Speaker talks about the lack of capital reaching real innovation. He blames this largely on incorrect metrics used to measure innovation, number of startups, intellectual property and the lack of insight to spend 10-15 years supporting the innovation pipeline. The speaker encourages more industry academic co-operation to root researchers in solving problems that are tangible in today's markets thereby producing real innovation.

     

    Reply Report abuse

    Please login to vote.

  13. 0 Dislike

    Gang Yang

    4.0 out of 5 stars

    An overall very good seminar about innovation.

    One thing I really like about this lecture is how deep it explains what actually makes innovation happen. I recall that in my semester (Fall 2015) taking this course other seminar also talked about innovation, although it was not the main part. It also explained why innovation is not invention, and shows the pieces (market, implementation and technology) but didn't clearly showed how they interact. It showed innovation process as more or less linear (or maybe just me not understanding that seminar well enough). On the other hand this lecture takes a step further and clearly explains why innovation process is iterative with 3 pieces interacting with each other. People watching this would have very clear understanding about innovation.

    Another aspect I found interesting is since this lecture was in 2010 and US was still recovering from the Great Recession, the speaker started the lecture with the question why capital can't converge in right place where innovation is happening. While I don't believe the cause is investors had little understanding of innovation process (the root cause is probably greed), I think this lecture could also be shown to business people besides engineers. The information about how innovation happens, what is the current state of innovation and how we can solve the problems is helpful to both groups making decisions.

    Reply Report abuse

    Please login to vote.