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Home Online Presentations Inside Real Innovation Reviews

Inside Real Innovation

By Eugene A. Fitzgerald

Materials Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA

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    Gang Yang

    4.0 out of 5 stars

    An overall very good seminar about innovation.

    One thing I really like about this lecture is how deep it explains what actually makes innovation happen. I recall that in my semester (Fall 2015) taking this course other seminar also talked about innovation, although it was not the main part. It also explained why innovation is not invention, and shows the pieces (market, implementation and technology) but didn't clearly showed how they interact. It showed innovation process as more or less linear (or maybe just me not understanding that seminar well enough). On the other hand this lecture takes a step further and clearly explains why innovation process is iterative with 3 pieces interacting with each other. People watching this would have very clear understanding about innovation.

    Another aspect I found interesting is since this lecture was in 2010 and US was still recovering from the Great Recession, the speaker started the lecture with the question why capital can't converge in right place where innovation is happening. While I don't believe the cause is investors had little understanding of innovation process (the root cause is probably greed), I think this lecture could also be shown to business people besides engineers. The information about how innovation happens, what is the current state of innovation and how we can solve the problems is helpful to both groups making decisions.

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