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2010 Honorary Symposium for Professor Milton Feng at The Micro and Nano Technology Laboratory UIUC

By Rashid Bashir1, Andreas Cangellaris1, Omar N Sobh1

1. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

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Abstract

Symposium honoring Professor Milton Feng on his 60th birthday.

Milton Feng with Nick Holonyak, Jr.
Milton Feng (left) with Nick Holonyak, Jr. (right),
co-inventors of the light emitting transistor.

Bio

Milton Feng co-created the first transistor laser, working with Nick Holonyak in 2004. The paper discussing their work was voted in 2006 as one of the five most important papers published by the American Institute of Physics since its founding 75 years ago. In addition to the invention of transistor laser, he is also well known for inventions of other "major breakthrough" devices, including the world's fastest transistor and light emitting transistor (LET). As of May, 2009 he is a professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and holds the Nick Holonyak Jr. Endowed Chair Professorship.

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The Micro and Nano Technology Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

Cite this work

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

  • Rashid Bashir; Andreas Cangellaris; Omar N Sobh (2010), "2010 Honorary Symposium for Professor Milton Feng at The Micro and Nano Technology Laboratory UIUC," http://nanohub.org/resources/9342.

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Micro and Nanotechnology Lab, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL

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In This Series

  1. 2010 MNTL UIUC Symposium Lecture 1 - Milton Feng at 60 : The Metamorphosis of the Transistor into a Laser

    09 Aug 2010 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Nick Holonyak, Jr

    Nick Holonyak, Jr.
    Nick Holonyak, Jr. (born November 3, 1928, in Zeigler, Illinois) invented the first visible LED in 1962 while working as a consulting scientist at a General Electric Company laboratory in Syracuse, New York and has been called "the father of the light-emitting...

  2. 2010 MNTL UIUC Symposium Lecture 6 - MNTL Labs & Milton Feng Outro

    25 Jul 2010 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Rashid Bashir

    Rashid Bashir
    Rashid Bashir completed his BSEE from Texas Tech University as the highest ranking graduate in the College of Engineering in Dec 1987. He completed his MSEE from Purdue University in 1989 and Ph.D. from Purdue University in 1992. From Oct 1992 to Oct 1998, he...

  3. 2010 MNTL UIUC Symposium Lecture 5 - Device Scaling

    24 Aug 2010 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Peter Apostolakis

  4. 2010 MNTL UIUC Symposium Lecture 2 - Optoelectronics

    09 Aug 2010 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Russell D. Dupuis

    Russell D. Dupuis
    Russell D. Dupuis earned all of his academic degrees from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He received his bachelor’s degree with “Highest Honors-Bronze Tablet” in 1970. He received his master’s in electrical engineering in 1971, and his doctorate...

  5. 2010 MNTL UIUC Symposium Lecture 4 - MicroElectronics

    09 Aug 2010 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Shyh-Chiang Shen

    Shyh-Chiang Shen
    Dr. Shen received his B.S. and M.S. degrees in electrical engineering at the National Taiwan University in 1993 and 1995, respectively. He earned his Ph.D. in electrical engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 2001. During his graduate...

  6. 2010 MNTL UIUC Symposium Lecture 3 - Large Scale InP Photonic Integrated Circuits

    24 Aug 2010 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Frederick A. Kish, Jr.

    Frederick A. Kish, Jr., Ph.D. is Vice President, PIC Development and Manufacturing for Infinera Corporation. From November 1999 to May 2001, Dr. Kish served as R&D and Manufacturing Development Manager for the Fiber Optics Communications Division of Agilent Technologies, Inc. Dr. Kish...

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