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2010 MNTL UIUC Symposium Lecture 6 - MNTL Labs & Milton Feng Outro

By Rashid Bashir

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Published on

Bio

Rashid Bashir Rashid Bashir completed his BSEE from Texas Tech University as the highest ranking graduate in the College of Engineering in Dec 1987. He completed his MSEE from Purdue University in 1989 and Ph.D. from Purdue University in 1992. From Oct 1992 to Oct 1998, he worked at National Semiconductor in the Analog/Mixed Signal Process Technology Development Group where he was promoted to Sr. Engineering Manager in the Process Technology Group. He joined Purdue University in Oct 1998 as Assistant Professor and was Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and a Courtesy Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Mechanical Engineering. Since Oct 2007, he is the Abel Bliss Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering & Bioengineering and Director of the Micro and Nano Technology Laboratory at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. He has authored or co-authored over 140 journal and conference papers, over 50 invited talks, and has been granted 30 patents. His research interests include BioMEMS, Lab on a chip, nano-biotechnology, interfacing biology and engineering from molecular to tissue scale, and applications of semiconductor fabrication to biomedical engineering, all applied to solve biomedical problems.

Cite this work

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

  • Rashid Bashir (2010), "2010 MNTL UIUC Symposium Lecture 6 - MNTL Labs & Milton Feng Outro," http://nanohub.org/resources/9420.

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Time

Location

Micro and Nanotechnology Lab, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL

Submitter

Omar N Sobh

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

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