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What We Know and Don’t Know About the Toxicity of Nanomaterials: Challenges in Developing Experimental Approaches for Safety Assessment

By Peter L Goering

U.S. Food and Drug Administration

Published on

Abstract

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulates medical products with nano-scale components and therefore is required to address the safety and biological effects of nanomaterials or materials with nano-scale features used in these products. The Center for Devices and Radiological Health/FDA is conducting studies of various nanomaterials and evaluating the utility of existing material characterization techniques and in vitro and in vivo toxicology assays. This seminar will summarize recent research activities at CDRH/FDA and highlight issues encountered in the characterization and biological responses of some prototypic nanomaterials.

Bio

Peter L. Goering Dr. Goering is active in research in biomarkers of cell injury in kidney and liver, toxicity of metals, animal models of compromised health and the toxicology of nanomaterials. He consults with Food and Drug Administration staff on toxicology issues, and health-based risk assessments related to medical products. He lectures and collaborates with faculty and graduate students as Adjunct Professor, Toxicology Program, University of Maryland and the Department of Biological Sciences, The George Washington University.

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Researchers should cite this work as follows:

  • Peter L Goering (2010), "What We Know and Don’t Know About the Toxicity of Nanomaterials: Challenges in Developing Experimental Approaches for Safety Assessment," http://nanohub.org/resources/9941.

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Time

Location

CIVIL 1252, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN

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