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PhotonicsCL: Photonic Cylindrical Multilayer Lenses

By Xingjie Ni1, Fan Gu1, Ludmila Prokopeva2, Alexander V. Kildishev3

1. Purdue University 2. Novosibirsk State University 3. Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA

Full wave simulation of cylindrical transformation optical lenses

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Version 0.21 - published on 14 Feb 2011

doi:10.4231/D3Q52FC6B cite this

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Abstract

PhotonicsCL: Photonic Cylindrical Multilayer Lenses is used for designing and simulating circular cylindrical multilayered and graded index structures. The designed multilayered cylindrical structure can serve as a piecewise-constant approximation for a variety of ideal optical devices with continuous distribution of material constants, e.g., Eaton lenses, Luneburg lenses, and optical “black hole” devices (omnidirectional light concentrators and absorbers). Also the direct simulation of an ideal optical “black hole” is available. The tool allows for different types of light sources, including point sources, plane wave source, and multiple Gaussian beam sources. It also has a link to the material database and can use all the database materials, as well as a user-specified material, in the design.

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Researchers should cite this work as follows:

  • Xingjie Ni; Fan Gu; Ludmila Prokopeva; Alexander V. Kildishev (2010), "PhotonicsCL: Photonic Cylindrical Multilayer Lenses," http://nanohub.org/resources/photonicscl. (DOI: 10.4231/D3Q52FC6B).

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