Support

Support Options

Submit a Support Ticket

 

This section is unavailable in an archive version of a tool.

Measuring Youngs Modulus

By Aarti Chigullapalli1, Jason Clark1

1. Purdue University

An accurate and precise method for measuring the Youngs modulus of MEMS with comb drives by electronic probing of capacitance.

Launch Tool

This tool version is unpublished and cannot be run. If you would like to have this version staged, you can put a request through HUB Support.

Archive Version 0.1
Published on 02 Jul 2012, unpublished on 03 Jul 2012 All versions

doi:10.4231/D3K649S3G cite this

Open source: license | download

See also

No results found.

Category

Tools

Published on

Abstract

an accurate and precise method for measuring the Young’s modulus of MEMS with comb drives by electronic probing of capacitance. The electronic measurement can be performed off-chip for quality control or on-chip after packaging for self-calibration. Young’s modulus is an important material property that affects the static or dynamic performance of MEMS. Electrically-probed measurements of Young’s modulus may also be useful for industrial scale automation. Conventional methods for measuring Young’s modulus include analyzing stress-strain curves, which is typically destructive, or include analyzing a large array of test structures of varying dimensions, which requires a large amount of chip real estate. Our method measures Young’s modulus by uniquely eliminating unknowns and extracting the fabricated geometry, displacement, comb drive force, and stiffness. Since Young’s modulus is related to geometry and stiffness that we find using electronic measurands, we are able to express Young’s modulus as a function of electronic measurands. We verify our method by using it to predict the Young’s modulus of a computer model. We treat the computer model as we would a true experiment by depending only on its electronic measurands. We find good agreement in predicting the exactly known Young’s modulus in a computer model within 0.1%.

No classroom usage data was found. You may need to enable JavaScript to view this data.

nanoHUB.org, a resource for nanoscience and nanotechnology, is supported by the National Science Foundation and other funding agencies. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.