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Tags: band structure

Description

In solid-state physics, the electronic band structure of a solid describes ranges of energy that an electron is "forbidden" or "allowed" to have. It is a function of the diffraction of the quantum mechanical electron waves in the periodic crystal lattice with a specific crystal system and Bravais lattice. The band structure of a material determines several characteristics, in particular its electronic and optical properties. More information on Band structure can be found here.

Resources (21-40 of 113)

  1. Computational Nanoscience, Lecture 4: Geometry Optimization and Seeing What You're Doing

    13 Feb 2008 | Teaching Materials | Contributor(s): Jeffrey C Grossman, Elif Ertekin

    In this lecture, we discuss various methods for finding the ground state structure of a given system by minimizing its energy. Derivative and non-derivative methods are discussed, as well as the...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/4035

  2. Homework Assignment: Periodic Potentials

    31 Jan 2008 | Teaching Materials | Contributor(s): David K. Ferry

    Using the Periodic Potential Lab on nanoHUB determine the allowed bands for an energy barrier of 5 eV, a periodicity W = 0.5nm, and a barrier thickness of 0.1nm. How do these bands change if the...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/3950

  3. Finite Height Quantum Well: an Exercise for Band Structure

    31 Jan 2008 | Teaching Materials | Contributor(s): David K. Ferry

    Use the Resonant Tunneling Diodes simulation tool on nanoHUB to explore the effects of finite height quantum wells. Looking at a 2 barrier device, 300 K, no bias, other standard variables, and 3...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/3949

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