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Tags: carbon nanotubes

Description

100 amps of electricity crackle in a vacuum chamber, creating a spark that transforms carbon vapor into tiny structures. Depending on the conditions, these structures can be shaped like little, 60-atom soccer balls, or like rolled-up tubes of atoms, arranged in a chicken-wire pattern, with rounded ends. These tiny, carbon nanotubes, discovered by Sumio Iijima at NEC labs in 1991, have amazing properties. They are 100 times stronger than steel, but weigh only one-sixth as much. They are incredibly resilient under physical stress; even when kinked to a 120-degree angle, they will bounce back to their original form, undamaged. And they can carry electrical current at levels that would vaporize ordinary copper wires.

Learn more about carbon nanotubes from the many resources on this site, listed below. More information on Carbon nanotubes can be found here.

Resources (1-20 of 139)

  1. The Road Ahead for Carbon Nanotube Transistors

    09 Jul 2013 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Aaron Franklin

    In this talk, recent advancements in the nanotube transistor field will be reviewed, showing why CNTFETs are worth considering now more than ever. Then, the material- and device-related challenges...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/18867

  2. Carbon-Based Nanoswitch Logic

    28 Mar 2013 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Stephen A. Campbell

    This talk discusses a rather surprising possibility: the use of carbon-based materials such as carbon nanotubes and grapheneto make nanomechanical switches with at least an order of magnitude...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/17328

  3. Journey Along the Carbon Road

    19 Apr 2012 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Zhihong Chen

    I will discuss two distinct topics: In the first part of my talk I will present results on carbon nanotubes focusing on high performance computing with the aim to replace silicon in logic device...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/13350

  4. BME 695L Lecture 5: Nanomaterials for Core Design

    03 Oct 2011 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): James Leary

    See references below for related reading. 5.1      Introduction 5.1.1    core building blocks 5.1.2    functional...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/12057

  5. Tutorial 2: Thermal Transport Across Interfaces - Electrons

    16 Aug 2011 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Timothy S Fisher

    Outline: Thermal boundary resistance Electronic transport Real interfaces and measurements Carbon nanotube interfaces “Electronics from the Bottom Up” is an educational initiative designed...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/11840

  6. Nanodays - Space—Lab on Chip Technology: The final frontier

    18 May 2011 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Marshall Porterfield

    D. Marshall Porterfield is a Professor of Agricultural & Biological Engineering with a joint appointment in Horticulture and Landscape Architecture. Dr. Porterfield received his B.S. from the...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/11304

  7. NanoDays - Artificial Photosynthesis with Biomimetic Nanomaterials: Self-Repairing Solar Cells

    05 May 2011 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Jong Hyun Choi

    Purdue NanoDays Purdue University Office of Engagement NANOVIS Incorporated Purdue Research Park Barnds & Thornburg, LLP Conexus Indiana Intel Corporation nano Professor Verso Paper...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/11235

  8. Putting the Electron’s Spin to Work

    14 Apr 2011 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Daniel Ralph

    I will discuss recent progress in experimental techniques to control the orientations of nanoscale magnetic moments and electron spins, and to use these new means of control for applications. One...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/11107

  9. Tutorial 2: A Bottom-Up View of Heat Transfer in Nanomaterials

    23 Mar 2011 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Timothy S Fisher

    This lecture provides a theoretical development of the transport of thermal energy by conduction in nanomaterials. The physical nature of energy transport by two carriers—electrons and...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/11029

  10. Illinois Nano EP Seminar Series Spring 2010 - Lecture 3: Characterization and Modeling of Transport in Single Walled Carbon Nanotube Films for Device Applications

    23 Feb 2011 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Ashkan Behnam

    Single‐walled carbon nanotube (CNT) films are transparent, conductive, and flexible materials. These films have uniform physical and electronic properties, and can be mass produced in a cost...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/10569

  11. Illinois Nano EP Seminar Series Spring 2010 - Lecture 5: Alignment of Carbon Nanotubes: a Route to Nanoelectronics

    29 Jan 2011 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Jianliang Xiao

    Single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) possess extraordinary electrical properties, with many possible applications in electronics. Dense, horizontally aligned arrays of linearly configured SWNTs...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/10571

  12. Translational Research in Nano and Bio Mechanics

    18 Nov 2010 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Ken P. Chong

    One of the most challenging problems is the integration and interface between wet (biological) and dry (structural) materials. Nano and bio science and engineering is one of the frontiers in...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/10029

  13. Chemically Enhanced Carbon-Based Nanomaterials and Devices

    09 Nov 2010 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Mark Hersam

    Carbon-based nanomaterials have attracted significant attention due to their potential to enable and/or improve applications such as transistors, transparent conductors, solar cells, batteries,...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/9929

  14. Self-Consistent Geometry, Density and Stiffness of Carbon Nanotubes

    05 May 2010 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): R. Byron Pipes

    A self-consistent set of relationships is developed for the physical properties of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCN) and their hexagonal arrays as a function of the chiral vector integer...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/8924

  15. ECET 499N Lecture 11: Carbon Nanotubes - Synthesis and Applications

    12 Apr 2010 | Online Presentations

    Guest Lecture: Sungwon S. Kim

    http://nanohub.org/resources/8827

  16. ECET 499N Lecture 10: Nanomaterials

    12 Apr 2010 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Helen McNally

    http://nanohub.org/resources/8771

  17. Surface Characterization Studies of Carbon Materials: SS-DNA, SWCNT, Graphene, HOPG

    16 Feb 2010 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Dmitry Zemlyanov

    In this presentation examples of surface characterization studies of carbon specimens will be presented. (1) In particularly, the systematic XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) characterization...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/8312

  18. Nanotribology, Nanomechanics and Materials Characterization Studies

    08 Jun 2009 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Bharat Bhushan

    Fundamental nanotribological studies provide insight to molecular origins of interfacial phenomena including adhesion, friction, wear and lubrication. Friction and wear of lightly loaded...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/6573

  19. Modern X-ray Scattering Methods for Nanoscale Materials Analysis

    15 Oct 2008 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Richard J. Matyi

    Since its discovery by von Laue in 1912, X-ray diffraction has become an indispensable tool for structure determinations in the physical and biological sciences. X-rays are characterized by high...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/5580

  20. Some Important Aspects of the Chemistry of Nanomaterials

    01 Jul 2008 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): C.N.R. Rao

    Keynote address for the launch of the Center for Analytical Instrumentation Development.

    http://nanohub.org/resources/4838

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