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Tags: carbon nanotubes

Description

100 amps of electricity crackle in a vacuum chamber, creating a spark that transforms carbon vapor into tiny structures. Depending on the conditions, these structures can be shaped like little, 60-atom soccer balls, or like rolled-up tubes of atoms, arranged in a chicken-wire pattern, with rounded ends. These tiny, carbon nanotubes, discovered by Sumio Iijima at NEC labs in 1991, have amazing properties. They are 100 times stronger than steel, but weigh only one-sixth as much. They are incredibly resilient under physical stress; even when kinked to a 120-degree angle, they will bounce back to their original form, undamaged. And they can carry electrical current at levels that would vaporize ordinary copper wires.

Learn more about carbon nanotubes from the many resources on this site, listed below. More information on Carbon nanotubes can be found here.

Resources (81-100 of 139)

  1. Carbon Nanotubes Interconnect Analyzer (CNIA)

    14 Mar 2007 | Tools | Contributor(s): Sansiri Tanachutiwat, Wei Wang

    Analyze performances of carbon nanotube bundle interconnects

    http://nanohub.org/resources/cnia

  2. What Can the TEM Tell You About Your Nanomaterial?

    26 Feb 2007 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Eric Stach

    In this tutorial, I will present a brief overview of the ways that transmission electron microscopy can be used to characterize nanoscale materials. This tutorial will emphasize what TEM does...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/2359

  3. Dendrimer-Templated Catalyst for Controlled Growth of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes by Plasma-Enhanced CVD

    20 Feb 2007 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Placidus Amama

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are an important class of materials with several technological applications because they possess unparalleled properties in terms of ballistic electrical conductivity,...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/2341

  4. CNTFET Lab

    13 Mar 2006 | Tools | Contributor(s): Neophytos Neophytou, Shaikh S. Ahmed, Eric Polizzi, Gerhard Klimeck, Mark Lundstrom

    Simulates ballistic transport properties in 3D Carbon NanoTube Field Effect Transistor (CNTFET) devices

    http://nanohub.org/resources/cntfet

  5. SPMW Nanotube, nanoneedle and nanomeniscus: mechanical and wetting properties of modified AFM tip apex

    12 Dec 2006 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): J. P. Aimé

    Among AFM microscopes, Dynamic force microscopes (DFM) are very sensitive to variation of minute forces involved in the interaction between the tip and the surface. However, despite numerous...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/2103

  6. SPMW Nanomechanics: from nanotechnology to biology

    12 Dec 2006 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Elisa Riedo

    The development of new materials with size of few nanometers has opened a new field of scientific and technological research. The goal is to develop faster and better communication systems and...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/2101

  7. Highly Efficient Thermal Transport: The Application of Carbon Nanotube Array Interfaces

    01 Feb 2007 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Baratunde A. Cola

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have received much attention in recent years for their extraordinary properties that through careful engineering may be leverage for the development of numerous...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/2317

  8. CNTbands

    14 Dec 2006 | Tools | Contributor(s): Gyungseon Seol, Youngki Yoon, James K Fodor, Jing Guo, Akira Matsudaira, Diego Kienle, Gengchiau Liang, Gerhard Klimeck, Mark Lundstrom, Ahmed Ibrahim Saeed

    This tool simulates E-k and DOS of CNTs and graphene nanoribbons.

    http://nanohub.org/resources/cntbands-ext

  9. Nanotechnology and Occupational Safety and Health: What are the Issues, What do we know, and What is NIOSH Doing

    21 Nov 2006 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Charles L. Geraci

    Nanotechnology and Occupational Safety and Health: What are the Issues, What do we know, and What is NIOSH Doing

    http://nanohub.org/resources/2008

  10. MOSCNT: code for carbon nanotube transistor simulation

    14 Nov 2006 | Downloads | Contributor(s): Siyu Koswatta, Jing Guo, Dmitri Nikonov

    Ballistic transport in carbon nanotube metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (CNT-MOSFETs) is simulated using the Non-equilibrium Green’s function formalism. A cylindrical transistor...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/1989

  11. Carbon Nanotube Electronics: Modeling, Physics, and Applications

    30 Oct 2006 | Papers | Contributor(s): Jing Guo

    In recent years, significant progress in understanding the physics of carbon nanotube electronic devices and in identifying potential applications has occurred. In a nanotube, low bias...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/1928

  12. Towards Multi-Scale Modeling of Carbon Nanotube Transistors

    20 Sep 2006 | Papers | Contributor(s): Jing Guo, Supriyo Datta, Mark Lundstrom, M. P. Anantram

    Multiscale simulation approaches are needed in order to address scientific and technological questions in the rapidly developing field of carbon nanotube electronics. In this paper, we...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/1818

  13. Nanoelectronic Architectures

    24 Feb 2005 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Greg Snider

    Nanoelectronic architectures at this point are necessarily speculative: We are still evaluating many different approaches to fabrication and are exploring unconventional devices made possible at...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/181

  14. Understanding Phonon Dynamics via 1D Atomic Chains

    04 Apr 2006 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Timothy S Fisher

    Phonons are the principal carriers of thermal energy in semiconductors and insulators, and they serve a vital role in dissipating heat produced by scattered electrons in semiconductor devices....

    http://nanohub.org/resources/1186

  15. Quantum Transport: Atom to Transistor (Spring 2004)

    23 May 2006 | Courses | Contributor(s): Supriyo Datta

    Spring 2004 Please Note: A newer version of this course is now available and we would greatly appreciate your feedback regarding the new format and contents. Course Information...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/1490

  16. Electrodeposition of Palladium as an Ohmic Contact for Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    03 Aug 2006 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Brent Penque, David Janes

    Carbon nanotubes are being researched extensively for their unique conductive properties. Controlled growth of vertical single-walled carbon nanotubes, however, has not yet been possible. This...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/1663

  17. Nanotubes and Nanowires: One-dimensional Materials

    17 Jul 2006 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Timothy D. Sands

    What is a nanowire? What is a nanotube? Why are they interesting and what are their potential applications? How are they made? This presentation is intended to begin to answer these questions...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/1639

  18. What is "Nanofluidics"? or The Nano-izing of Fluid Mechanics

    28 Jun 2006 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Steve Wereley

    Micro- and nanoscaled fluid mechanics are rapidly emerging as important supporting fields in biomedical technology, nanotechnology, etc., as well as being important fields of study in their own...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/1604

  19. CNTphonons

    30 May 2006 | Tools | Contributor(s): Marcelo Alejandro Kuroda, Salvador Barraza-Lopez, J. P. Leburton

    Calculates the phonon band structure of carbon nanotubes using the force constant method.

    http://nanohub.org/resources/cntphonons

  20. Logic Devices and Circuits on Carbon Nanotubes

    05 Apr 2006 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Joerg Appenzeller

    Over the last years carbon nanotubes (CNs) have attracted an increasing interest as building blocks for nano-electronics applications. Due to their unique properties enabling e.g. ballistic...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/1487

nanoHUB.org, a resource for nanoscience and nanotechnology, is supported by the National Science Foundation and other funding agencies. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.