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Tags: carbon nanotubes

Description

100 amps of electricity crackle in a vacuum chamber, creating a spark that transforms carbon vapor into tiny structures. Depending on the conditions, these structures can be shaped like little, 60-atom soccer balls, or like rolled-up tubes of atoms, arranged in a chicken-wire pattern, with rounded ends. These tiny, carbon nanotubes, discovered by Sumio Iijima at NEC labs in 1991, have amazing properties. They are 100 times stronger than steel, but weigh only one-sixth as much. They are incredibly resilient under physical stress; even when kinked to a 120-degree angle, they will bounce back to their original form, undamaged. And they can carry electrical current at levels that would vaporize ordinary copper wires.

Learn more about carbon nanotubes from the many resources on this site, listed below. More information on Carbon nanotubes can be found here.

Resources (1-20 of 139)

  1. Carbon NanoTubes: Structure - Properties - Applications

    19 Mar 2012 | Teaching Materials | Contributor(s): Yuri A Kruglyak

    Presentation slides for seminar given for students of Faculty of Computer Sciences of Odessa State Environmental University, Ukraine by Prof. Yuri Kruglyak on May 22, 2008.

    http://nanohub.org/resources/13530

  2. Carrier Statistics Lab: First-Time User Guide

    09 Mar 2009 | Teaching Materials | Contributor(s): Abhijeet Paul, Gerhard Klimeck, Benjamin P Haley, Saumitra Raj Mehrotra

    This first-time user guide is an introduction to the Carrier Statistics Lab . It provides basic definitions, guidance on how to run the tool, and suggested exercises to help users get accustomed...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/6443

  3. Computational Nanoscience, Lecture 5: A Day of In-Class Simulation: MD of Carbon Nanostructures

    13 Feb 2008 | Teaching Materials | Contributor(s): Jeffrey C Grossman, Elif Ertekin

    In this lecture we carry out simulations in-class, with guidance from the instructors. We use the LAMMPS tool (within the nanoHUB simulation toolkit for this course). Examples include...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/4037

  4. Computational Nanoscience, Lecture 4: Geometry Optimization and Seeing What You're Doing

    13 Feb 2008 | Teaching Materials | Contributor(s): Jeffrey C Grossman, Elif Ertekin

    In this lecture, we discuss various methods for finding the ground state structure of a given system by minimizing its energy. Derivative and non-derivative methods are discussed, as well as the...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/4035

  5. Resonant Tunneling Diodes: an Exercise

    06 Jan 2006 | Teaching Materials | Contributor(s): H.-S. Philip Wong

    This homework assignment was created by H.-S. Philip Wong for EE 218 "Introduction to Nanoelectronics and Nanotechnology" (Stanford University). It includes a couple of simple "warm up" exercises...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/891

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