Tags: carbon nanotubes

Description

100 amps of electricity crackle in a vacuum chamber, creating a spark that transforms carbon vapor into tiny structures. Depending on the conditions, these structures can be shaped like little, 60-atom soccer balls, or like rolled-up tubes of atoms, arranged in a chicken-wire pattern, with rounded ends. These tiny, carbon nanotubes, discovered by Sumio Iijima at NEC labs in 1991, have amazing properties. They are 100 times stronger than steel, but weigh only one-sixth as much. They are incredibly resilient under physical stress; even when kinked to a 120-degree angle, they will bounce back to their original form, undamaged. And they can carry electrical current at levels that would vaporize ordinary copper wires.

Learn more about carbon nanotubes from the many resources on this site, listed below. More information on Carbon nanotubes can be found here.

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  1. Nadya Mason

    Assistant Professor, Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Professor Nadya Mason received her bachelor's degree in physics from Harvard University in 1995 and received...

    http://nanohub.org/members/53203

  2. Nano Carbon: From ballistic transistors to atomic drumheads

    14 May 2008 | | Contributor(s):: Paul L. McEuen

    Carbon takes many forms, from precious diamonds to lowly graphite. Surprisingly, it is the latter that is the most prized by nano physicists. Graphene, a single layer of graphite, can serve as an impenetrable membrane a single atom thick. Rolled up into a nanometer-diameter cylinder--a carbon...

  3. Nano Heatflow

    25 Sep 2007 | | Contributor(s):: Joe Ringgenberg, P. Alex Greaney, daniel richards, Jeffrey C Grossman, Jeffrey B. Neaton, Justin Riley

    Study the transfer of energy between the vibrational modes of a carbon nanotube.

  4. NanoDays - Artificial Photosynthesis with Biomimetic Nanomaterials: Self-Repairing Solar Cells

    05 May 2011 | | Contributor(s):: Jong Hyun Choi

  5. Nanodays - Space—Lab on Chip Technology: The final frontier

    13 May 2011 | | Contributor(s):: Marshall Porterfield

  6. Nanodevices: A Bottom-up View

    13 Jun 2005 | | Contributor(s):: Supriyo Datta

    It is common to differentiate between two ways of building a nanodevice: a top-down approach where we start from something big and chisel out what we want and a bottom-up approach where we start from something small like atoms or molecules and assemble what we want.

  7. Nanoelectronic Architectures

    24 Feb 2005 |

    Nanoelectronic architectures at this point are necessarily speculative: We are still evaluating many different approaches to fabrication and are exploring unconventional devices made possible at the nano scale. This talk will start off with a review of some "classical" crossbar structures using...

  8. Nanoelectronics/Mechanics With Carbon Nanotubes

    26 Feb 2004 |

    In this talk, I will present efforts to understand electrical/mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by combining electric transport measurements and the scanning probe microscopy.

  9. Nanoelectronics: The New Frontier?

    18 Apr 2005 | | Contributor(s):: Mark Lundstrom

    After forty years of advances in integrated circuit technology, microelectronics is undergoing a transformation to nanoelectronics. Modern day MOSFETs now have channel lengths of only 50 nm, and billion transistor logic chips have arrived. Moore’s Law continues, but the end of MOSFET scaling is...

  10. nanoJoule

    28 May 2008 | | Contributor(s):: Feifei Lian, Feifei Lian, Feifei Lian

    This tool performs a self-consistent simulation of the current-voltage curve of a metallic single-wall carbon nanotube with Joule heating.

  11. Nanomaterials: Quantum Dots, Nanowires and Nanotubes

    15 Jul 2005 |

    What is a quantum dot? What is a nanowire? What is a nanotube? Why are these interesting and what are their potential applications? How are they made? This presentation is intended to begin to answer these questions while introducing some fundamental concepts such as wave-particle duality,...

  12. Nanostructure Engineered Sensors for Gas Detection in Space and Terrestrial Applications

    28 Jul 2005 |

    A nanosensor technology has been developed using single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on a pair of interdigitated electrodes (IDE) processed with a silicon-based microfabrication and micromachining technique. These sensors have been exposed to nitrogen dioxide, methane, acetone, benzene,...

  13. Nanotechnology and Occupational Safety and Health: What are the Issues, What do we know, and What is NIOSH Doing

    21 Nov 2006 | | Contributor(s):: Chuck L Geraci

    Nanotechnology and Occupational Safety and Health: What are the Issues, What do we know, and What is NIOSH Doing

  14. Nanotribology, Nanomechanics and Materials Characterization Studies

    29 Mar 2009 | | Contributor(s):: Bharat Bhushan

    Fundamental nanotribological studies provide insight to molecular origins of interfacial phenomena including adhesion, friction, wear and lubrication. Friction and wear of lightly loaded micro/nano components are highly dependent on the surface interactions (few atomic layers). Nanotribological...

  15. Nanotubes and Nanowires: One-dimensional Materials

    17 Jul 2006 |

    What is a nanowire? What is a nanotube? Why are they interesting and what are their potential applications? How are they made? This presentation is intended to begin to answer these questions while introducing some fundamental concepts such as wave-particle duality, quantum confinement, the...

  16. narasimhulu thoti

    http://nanohub.org/members/137783

  17. neha rai

    http://nanohub.org/members/126462

  18. New Dimension in Performance: Harnessing 3D Integration Technology

    29 Nov 2007 | | Contributor(s):: Kerry Bernstein

    Despite generation on generation of scaling, computer chips have remained essentially 2-dimensional. Improvements in on-chip wire delay, and in the total number of inputs and outputs has not been able to keep up with improvements to the transistor, and its getting harder and harder to hide it!...

  19. ninithi

    13 May 2010 | | Contributor(s):: Chanaka Suranjith Rupasinghe, Mufthas Rasikim

    ninithi which is a free and opensource modelling software, can be used to visualize and analyze carbon allotropes used in nanotechnology. You can generate 3-D visualization of Carbon nanotubes, Fullerenes, Graphene and Carbon nanoribbons and analyze the band structures of nanotubes and graphene.

  20. Oligodeoxyribonucleotide Association with Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    02 Aug 2007 | | Contributor(s):: Jennifer McDonald

    Commercially available single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) tend to aggregate as ropes and bundles during production making them of little use in many scientific and industrial applications. An effective technique for dispersing and solubilizing SWCNTs is required to fully utilize their...