Support

Support Options

Submit a Support Ticket

 

Tags: carbon nanotubes

Description

100 amps of electricity crackle in a vacuum chamber, creating a spark that transforms carbon vapor into tiny structures. Depending on the conditions, these structures can be shaped like little, 60-atom soccer balls, or like rolled-up tubes of atoms, arranged in a chicken-wire pattern, with rounded ends. These tiny, carbon nanotubes, discovered by Sumio Iijima at NEC labs in 1991, have amazing properties. They are 100 times stronger than steel, but weigh only one-sixth as much. They are incredibly resilient under physical stress; even when kinked to a 120-degree angle, they will bounce back to their original form, undamaged. And they can carry electrical current at levels that would vaporize ordinary copper wires.

Learn more about carbon nanotubes from the many resources on this site, listed below. More information on Carbon nanotubes can be found here.

All Categories (141-160 of 313)

  1. Quantum Dots

    21 Jul 2005 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Gerhard Klimeck

    Quantum Dots are man-made artificial atoms that confine electrons to a small space. As such, they have atomic-like behavior and enable the study of quantum mechanical effects on a length scale...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/189

  2. Quantum Transport: Atom to Transistor (Spring 2004)

    23 May 2006 | Courses | Contributor(s): Supriyo Datta

    Spring 2004 Please Note: A newer version of this course is now available and we would greatly appreciate your feedback regarding the new format and contents. Course Information...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/1490

  3. Random Forest Model Objects for Pulmonary Toxicity Risk Assessment

    17 Apr 2013 | Downloads | Contributor(s): Jeremy M Gernand

    This download contains MATLAB treebagger or Random Forest (RF) model objects created via meta-analysis of nanoparticle rodent pulmonary toxicity experiments. The ReadMe.txt file contains object...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/17539

  4. Resonant Tunneling Diodes: an Exercise

    06 Jan 2006 | Teaching Materials | Contributor(s): H.-S. Philip Wong

    This homework assignment was created by H.-S. Philip Wong for EE 218 "Introduction to Nanoelectronics and Nanotechnology" (Stanford University). It includes a couple of simple "warm up" exercises...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/891

  5. Review of Schottky-barrier CNFET

    The tool Schottky-Barrier CNFET allows users to generate source-drain current versus source-drain bias of a carbon nanotube field effect transistor (CNFET) with Schottky-Barrier (SB) contacts. The...

    http://nanohub.org/groups/illinois_ece_539_advanced_theory_of_semiconductors_and_devices/wiki/ReviewofSchottkybarrierCNFET

  6. Review on

    Using CNTbands is good way to learn about the physics of the CNTs. Band structure and density of states of CNT can be simulated by using CNTbands. Input parameters are chirality, distance between...

    http://nanohub.org/groups/illinois_ece_539_advanced_theory_of_semiconductors_and_devices/wiki/ReviewonCNTbands

  7. Schottky-Barrier CNFET

    16 Mar 2007 | Tools | Contributor(s): Arash Hazeghi, Tejas Krishnamohan, H.-S. Philip Wong

    Simulate Carbon Nanotube field Effect transistor with Schottky Barriers

    http://nanohub.org/resources/sbcnfet

  8. Selected Properties of Carbon Nanostructures: from Exotic Fullerenes to Nanotubes

    30 Mar 2008 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Manfred M. Kappes

    The talk presents results from ongoing projects in the field of carbon nanostructures: (i) Mass selected ion beam soft-landing has been used to generate exotic fullerene materials comprising...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/4206

  9. Self-Consistent Geometry, Density and Stiffness of Carbon Nanotubes

    05 May 2010 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): R. Byron Pipes

    A self-consistent set of relationships is developed for the physical properties of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCN) and their hexagonal arrays as a function of the chiral vector integer...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/8924

  10. Self-Consistent Properties of Carbon Nanotubes and Hexagonal Arrays as Composite Reinforcements

    05 May 2010 | Publications | Contributor(s): R. Byron Pipes

    A self-consistent set of relationships is developed for the physical properties of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCN) and their hexagonal arrays as a function of the chiral vector integer pair,...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/8933

  11. Semiconductor Interfaces at the Nanoscale

    17 Oct 2005 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): David Janes

    The trend in downscaling of electronic devices and the need to add functionalities such as sensing and nonvolatile memory to existing circuitry dictate that new approaches be developed for device...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/196

  12. Some Important Aspects of the Chemistry of Nanomaterials

    01 Jul 2008 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): C.N.R. Rao

    Keynote address for the launch of the Center for Analytical Instrumentation Development.

    http://nanohub.org/resources/4838

  13. SPMW Nanomechanics: from nanotechnology to biology

    12 Dec 2006 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Elisa Riedo

    The development of new materials with size of few nanometers has opened a new field of scientific and technological research. The goal is to develop faster and better communication systems and...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/2101

  14. SPMW Nanotube, nanoneedle and nanomeniscus: mechanical and wetting properties of modified AFM tip apex

    12 Dec 2006 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): J. P. Aimé

    Among AFM microscopes, Dynamic force microscopes (DFM) are very sensitive to variation of minute forces involved in the interaction between the tip and the surface. However, despite numerous...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/2103

  15. Surface Characterization Studies of Carbon Materials: SS-DNA, SWCNT, Graphene, HOPG

    16 Feb 2010 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Dmitry Zemlyanov

    In this presentation examples of surface characterization studies of carbon specimens will be presented. (1) In particularly, the systematic XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy) characterization...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/8312

  16. SURI 2003 Conference

    07 Aug 2003 | Workshops

    2003 SURI Conference Proceedings

    http://nanohub.org/resources/134

  17. The Bardeen Transfer Hamiltonian Approach to Tunneling and its Application to STM/Carbon Nanotubes

    05 May 2004 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Peter Albrecht, Kyle Ritter, Laura Ruppalt

    This presentation covers the Bardeen Transfer Hamiltonian approach to tunneling and its application to STM/carbon nanotubes.

    http://nanohub.org/resources/382

  18. The Effect of Physical Geometry on the Frequency Response of Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors

    03 Aug 2007 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Dave Lyzenga

    In order for carbon nanotube (CNT) electrical devices to be fabricated, it is necessary to obtain modifiable operation characteristics. Developing parametric equations to achieve this...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/3044

  19. The Effect of Temperature Control on the Mechanical Behavior of Carbon Nanotubes

    29 Mar 2006 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): SeongJun Heo, Susan Sinnott

    The effect of thermostat configurations on the mechanical behavior of empty and butane (n-C4H10) filled (10,10) carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is examined using classical, atomistic, molecular dynamics...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/1140

  20. The Long and Short of Pick-up Stick Transistors: A Promising Technology for Nano- and Macro-Electronics

    11 Apr 2006 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Muhammad A. Alam

    In recent years, there has been enormous interest in the emerging field of large-area macro-electronics, and fabricating thin-film transistors on flexible substrates. This talk will cover recent...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/1214

nanoHUB.org, a resource for nanoscience and nanotechnology, is supported by the National Science Foundation and other funding agencies. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.