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Tags: carbon nanotubes

Description

100 amps of electricity crackle in a vacuum chamber, creating a spark that transforms carbon vapor into tiny structures. Depending on the conditions, these structures can be shaped like little, 60-atom soccer balls, or like rolled-up tubes of atoms, arranged in a chicken-wire pattern, with rounded ends. These tiny, carbon nanotubes, discovered by Sumio Iijima at NEC labs in 1991, have amazing properties. They are 100 times stronger than steel, but weigh only one-sixth as much. They are incredibly resilient under physical stress; even when kinked to a 120-degree angle, they will bounce back to their original form, undamaged. And they can carry electrical current at levels that would vaporize ordinary copper wires.

Learn more about carbon nanotubes from the many resources on this site, listed below. More information on Carbon nanotubes can be found here.

All Categories (21-40 of 315)

  1. ABDUL WAHEED ANWAR

    Third year phd student

    http://nanohub.org/members/35034

  2. Abu Raihan

    http://nanohub.org/members/57265

  3. Akshay Kumar Mahadev Arabhavi

    http://nanohub.org/members/88213

  4. An Electrical Engineering Perspective on Molecular Electronics

    26 Oct 2005 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Mark Lundstrom

    After forty years of advances in integrated circuit technology, microelectronics is undergoing a transformation to nanoelectronics. Modern day MOSFETs now have channel lengths that are less than...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/513

  5. Analysis of DC Electrical Conductivity Models of Carbon Nanotube-Polymer Composites with Potential Application to Nanometric Electronic Devices

    12 Mar 2013 | Papers | Contributor(s): Rafael Vargas-Bernal, Gabriel Herrera-Pérez, Ma. Elena Calixto-Olalde, Margarita Tecpoyotl-Torres

    The design of nanometric electronic devices requires novel materials for improving their electrical performance from stages of design until their fabrication. Until now, several DC electrical...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/17265

  6. Arpit Baral

    http://nanohub.org/members/112611

  7. Ashkan Behnam

    Research assistant at University of Florida

    http://nanohub.org/members/7846

  8. Asmit Kumar Soni

    asdasdddddddddddddddddddd

    http://nanohub.org/members/69177

  9. Atomic Force Microscopy

    01 Dec 2005 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Arvind Raman

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is an indispensible tool in nano science for the fabrication, metrology, manipulation, and property characterization of nanostructures. This tutorial reviews some of...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/520

  10. Atomistic Modeling of the Mechanical Properties of Nanostructured Materials

    16 Apr 2007 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): SeongJun Heo, Susan Sinnott

    The mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes are studied by using classical molecular dynamics simulations. Especially, the effects of filling, temperature, and functionalization on CNT's...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/2604

  11. Bagavathi Shivakumar

    http://nanohub.org/members/55079

  12. Bandstructure of Carbon Nanotubes and Nanoribbons

    14 Jun 2007 | Learning Modules | Contributor(s): James K Fodor, Seokmin Hong, Jing Guo

    This learning module introduces users to the Carbon-Nano Bands simulation tool, which simulates the bandstructure of Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) and Nanoribbons (CNRs). To gives users a strong...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/2762

  13. Baskaran Karthikeyan

    A Curious Student involved in science

    http://nanohub.org/members/82602

  14. Bending Properties of Carbon Nanotubes

    21 Mar 2006 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): SeongJun Heo, Susan Sinnott

    The effect of filling carbon nanotubes on the mechanical, especially bending, behavior of empty and filled (10,10) carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is examined using classical, atomistic, molecular...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/1106

  15. BME 695L Lecture 5: Nanomaterials for Core Design

    03 Oct 2011 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): James Leary

    See references below for related reading. 5.1      Introduction 5.1.1    core building blocks 5.1.2    functional...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/12057

  16. BNC Annual Research Symposium: Nanoelectronics and Semiconductor Devices

    23 Apr 2007 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): David Janes

    This presentation is part of a collection of presentations describing the projects, people, and capabilities enhanced by research performed in the Birck Center, and a look at plans for the...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/2632

  17. BNC Annual Research Symposium: Nanoscale Energy Conversion

    23 Apr 2007 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Timothy S Fisher

    This presentation is part of a collection of presentations describing the projects, people, and capabilities enhanced by research performed in the Birck Center, and a look at plans for the...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/2636

  18. BNC Research Review: Carbon Nanotubes as Nucleic Acid Carriers

    04 Jun 2008 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Don Bergstrom

    This presentation is part of a collection of presentations describing the projects, people, and capabilities enhanced by research performed in the Birck Center, and a look at plans for the...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/4712

  19. Boltzmann Transport Simulator for CNTs

    20 Feb 2008 | Tools | Contributor(s): Zlatan Aksamija, Umberto Ravaioli

    Simulate Electron transport in Single-walled carbon nanotubes using an upwinding discretization of the Boltzmann transport equation in the relaxation time approximation.

    http://nanohub.org/resources/cntbte

  20. Buckypaper

    17 Apr 2013 | Presentation Materials | Contributor(s): shaheen goel

    the presentation gives a basic idea about the buckypaper and give breif details about the synthesis properties and applications of buckypaper

    http://nanohub.org/resources/17607

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