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Tags: carbon nanotubes


100 amps of electricity crackle in a vacuum chamber, creating a spark that transforms carbon vapor into tiny structures. Depending on the conditions, these structures can be shaped like little, 60-atom soccer balls, or like rolled-up tubes of atoms, arranged in a chicken-wire pattern, with rounded ends. These tiny, carbon nanotubes, discovered by Sumio Iijima at NEC labs in 1991, have amazing properties. They are 100 times stronger than steel, but weigh only one-sixth as much. They are incredibly resilient under physical stress; even when kinked to a 120-degree angle, they will bounce back to their original form, undamaged. And they can carry electrical current at levels that would vaporize ordinary copper wires.

Learn more about carbon nanotubes from the many resources on this site, listed below. More information on Carbon nanotubes can be found here.

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  1. Electronic Transport in Semi-conducting Carbon Nanotube Transistor Devices

    16 Oct 2003 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Joerg Appenzeller

    Recent demonstrations of high performance carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNFETs) highlight their potential for a future nanotube-based electronics. Besides being just a nanometer in...

  2. Engineering the Fiber-Matrix Interface in Carbon Nanotube Composites

    23 Mar 2006 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Sharon K. Pregler, Yanhong Hu, Susan Sinnott

    Particle depositions on polymer and carbon substrates to induce surface chemical modification are a growing research topic in particle-surface interactions due to localized deposition energy...

  3. Esteve Amat

  4. Excellence in Computer Simulation: Computational Materials

    20 Dec 2007 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Eric Schwegler

    This presentation was one of 13 presentations in the one-day forum, "Excellence in Computer Simulation," which brought together a broad set of experts to reflect on the future of...

  5. Fernando Cruz

  6. FETToy

    14 Feb 2006 | Tools | Contributor(s): Anisur Rahman, Jing Wang, Jing Guo, Md. Sayed Hasan, Yang Liu, Akira Matsudaira, Shaikh S. Ahmed, Supriyo Datta, Mark Lundstrom

    Calculate the ballistic I-V characteristics for conventional MOSFETs, Nanowire MOSFETs and Carbon NanoTube MOSFETs

  7. Fouling Mechanisms in Y-shaped Carbon Nanotubes

    04 Apr 2007 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Jason Myers, SeongJun Heo, Susan Sinnott

    In the modern pharmaceutical and chemical industries, solutions of extremely high purity are needed. Current filtration methods are reaching the limits of their abilities, so new filters must be...

  8. From Research to Learning in Chemistry through Visualization and Computation

    17 May 2007 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Eric Jakobsson

    Modern chemistry research and high school chemistry education are separated by institutional and geographical boundaries. As such, much of secondary chemistry education is still based on the...

  9. Fundamentals of Nanoelectronics (Fall 2004)

    01 Sep 2004 | Courses | Contributor(s): Supriyo Datta, Behtash Behinaein

    Please Note: A newer version of this course is now available and we would greatly appreciate your feedback regarding the new format and contents. Welcome to the ECE 453 lectures. The...


  11. Heat Transfer across Solid Contacts Enhanced with Nanomaterials

    11 Feb 2008 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Timothy S Fisher

    This presentation will describe thermal transport processes at solid-solid material interfaces. An overview of applications in the electronics industry will serve to motivate the subject, and then...

  12. Heeyuen Koh

  13. hiader abdul razaq

  14. Highly Efficient Thermal Transport: The Application of Carbon Nanotube Array Interfaces

    01 Feb 2007 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Baratunde A. Cola

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have received much attention in recent years for their extraordinary properties that through careful engineering may be leverage for the development of numerous...

  15. Illinois Nano EP Seminar Series Spring 2010 - Lecture 3: Characterization and Modeling of Transport in Single Walled Carbon Nanotube Films for Device Applications

    23 Feb 2011 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Ashkan Behnam

    Single‐walled carbon nanotube (CNT) films are transparent, conductive, and flexible materials. These films have uniform physical and electronic properties, and can be mass produced in a cost...

  16. Illinois Nano EP Seminar Series Spring 2010 - Lecture 5: Alignment of Carbon Nanotubes: a Route to Nanoelectronics

    29 Jan 2011 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Jianliang Xiao

    Single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) possess extraordinary electrical properties, with many possible applications in electronics. Dense, horizontally aligned arrays of linearly configured SWNTs...

  17. In-situ carbon nanotube tensile test

    07 Oct 2011 | Animations | Contributor(s): Brian Demczyk

    This represents the first in-situ tensile test observed in a transmission electron microscope.

  18. Inelastic Transport in Carbon Nanotube Electronic and Optoelectronic Devices

    28 Jun 2013 | Papers | Contributor(s): Siyu Koswatta

    Discovered in the early 1990's, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are found to have exceptional physical characteristics compared to conventional semiconductor materials, with much potential for devices...

  19. Interfacing Carbon Nanotubes with Biological Systems: From Biosensors to Cellular Transporters

    21 Oct 2004 | Online Presentations | Contributor(s): Hongjie Dai

    This talk will discuss two relatively new topics in carbon nanotube research. The first is nanotubes for chemical and biological sensors, an exploration motivated by the ultra high surface area of...

  20. Introduction to Carbon Nanotube Electronics

    12 Oct 2005 | Learning Modules | Contributor(s): Susan Sinnott

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) have interesting, structure-dependent electronic properties. In particular, CNTs can be a metallic or semiconducting depending on the way in which the carbon atoms are..., a resource for nanoscience and nanotechnology, is supported by the National Science Foundation and other funding agencies. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.