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Tags: circuits

Description

In 1973, SPICE was introduced to the world by Professor Donald O. Pederson of the University of California at Berkeley, and a new era of computer-aided design (CAD) tools was born. As its name implies, SPICE is a "Simulation Program with Integrated Circuit Emphasis." You give it a description of an electrical circuit, made up of resistors, capacitors, inductors, and power sources, and SPICE will predict the performance of that circuit. Instead of bread-boarding new designs in the lab, circuit designers found they could optimize their designs on computers–in effect, using computers to build better computers. Since its introduction, SPICE has been commercialized and released in a dozen variants, such as H-SPICE, P-SPICE, and ADVICE.

Learn more about circuit simulation from the resources on this site, listed below. You might even acquire a taste for SPICE by running examples online.

Resources (1-20 of 51)

  1. Homework for Circuit Simulation: ECE 255

    08 Jan 2006 | Teaching Materials | Contributor(s): Gerold W. Neudeck

    This collection of homeworks is used in ECE 255 "Introduction to Electronic Analysis and Design" (Purdue University). Students do their work, or sometimes check their work, by using the Spice...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/931

  2. Resonant Tunneling Diodes: an Exercise

    06 Jan 2006 | Teaching Materials | Contributor(s): H.-S. Philip Wong

    This homework assignment was created by H.-S. Philip Wong for EE 218 "Introduction to Nanoelectronics and Nanotechnology" (Stanford University). It includes a couple of simple "warm up" exercises...

    http://nanohub.org/resources/891

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