Tags: devices

Description

On June 30, 1948, AT&T Bell Labs unveiled the transitor to the world, creating a spark of explosive economic growth that would lead into the Information Age. William Shockley led a team of researchers, including Walter Brattain and John Bardeen, who invented the device. Like the existing triode vacuum tube device, the transistor could amplify signals and switch currents on and off, but the transistor was smaller, cheaper, and more efficient. Moreover, it could be integrated with millions of other transistors onto a single chip, creating the integrated circuit at the heart of modern computers.

Today, most transistors are being manufactured with a minimum feature size of 60-90nm--roughly 200-300 atoms. As the push continues to make devices even smaller, researchers must account for quantum mechanical effects in the device behavior. With fewer and fewer atoms, the positions of impurities and other irregularities begin to matter, and device reliability becomes an issue. So rather than shrink existing devices, many researchers are working on entirely new devices, based on carbon nanotubes, spintronics, molecular conduction, and other nanotechnologies.

Learn more about transistors from the many resources on this site, listed below. Use our simulation tools to simulate performance characteristics for your own devices.

Resources (221-240 of 314)

  1. What Promises do Nanotubes and Nanowires Hold for Future Nanoelectronics Applications?

    18 Feb 2008 | | Contributor(s):: Joerg Appenzeller

    Various low-dimensional materials are currently explored for future electronics applications. The common ground for all these structures is that the surface related impact can no longer be ignored – the common approach applied to predict properties of bulk-type three-dimensional (3D) materials....

  2. TCAD Revisited, 2007: An Engineer’s Point of View

    19 Dec 2007 | | Contributor(s):: Constantin Bulucea

    This presentation was one of 13 presentations in the one-day forum, "Excellence in Computer Simulation," which brought together a broad set of experts to reflect on the future of computational science and engineering.

  3. Reliability Physics of Nanoscale Transistors

    27 Nov 2007 | | Contributor(s):: Muhammad A. Alam

    This course is now offered on nanoHUB as ECE 695A Reliability Physics of Nanotransistors.

  4. MCW07 Impact of Porphyrin Functional Groups on InAs Gas Sensors

    05 Nov 2007 | | Contributor(s):: Michael Garcia

    Porphyrin molecules are often used for sensor engineering to improve sensitivity and selectivity to specific analytes. It is important to understand how the porphyrin HOMO-LUMO levels deplete surface states during functionalization of solid state sensors. Additionally, the effect of...

  5. Silicon Photonics: Opportunity Challenges and Recent Results

    02 Nov 2007 | | Contributor(s):: Mario Paniccia

    The silicon chip has been the mainstay of the electronics industry for the last 40 years and has revolutionized the way the world operates. Today a silicon chip the size of a fingernail contains nearly one billion transistors and has the computing power that only a decade ago would take up an...

  6. Hexagonal Prism Blue Diode Laser Using Whispering Gallery Mode (WGM) Resonances

    23 Oct 2007 | | Contributor(s):: sangho kim

    Semiconductor lasers have many important applications, including communication technologies, optical storage, printing, and molecular detection. The range of applications could be broadened significantly if the lasers could be made smaller and with lower threshold currents. Today’s in-plane...

  7. Introduction of MEMS Activity at Nano/Micro System Engineering Lab., Kyoto University

    15 Sep 2007 | | Contributor(s):: OSAMU TABATA

    We are aiming at the realization of microsystems and nanosystems with novel and unique functions by integrating functional elements in different domains such as mechanics, electronics, chemistry, optics and biotechnology. These micro/nano systems are expected to be novel machines, which will...

  8. MCW07 Modeling Charging-based Switching in Molecular Transport Junctions

    23 Aug 2007 | | Contributor(s):: Sina Yeganeh, , Mark Ratner

    We will discuss several proposed explanations for the switching and negative differential resistance behavior seen in some molecular junctions. It is shown that a proposed polaron model is successful in predicting both hysteresis and NDR behavior, and the model is elaborated with image charge...

  9. Electronics From the Bottom Up: top-down/bottom-up views of length

    17 Aug 2007 | | Contributor(s):: Muhammad A. Alam

    When devices get small stochastic effects become important. Random dopant effects lead to uncertainties in a MOSFET’s threshold voltage and gate oxides breakdown is a random process. Even a concept as simple as “channel length” becomes uncertain. This short (20 min) talk, a footnote to the...

  10. The Nano-MOSFET: A brief introduction

    17 Aug 2007 | | Contributor(s):: Mark Lundstrom

    MOSFET channel lengths are now well below 100nm, and getting smaller, but MOSFETs are still modeled and understood much as they were 30 years ago. Seminal work in the 1960’s laid the foundation for our understanding of the MOSFET, but traditional approaches are based on concepts that lose...

  11. The Effect of Physical Geometry on the Frequency Response of Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors

    03 Aug 2007 | | Contributor(s):: Dave Lyzenga

    In order for carbon nanotube (CNT) electrical devices to be fabricated, it is necessary to obtain modifiable operation characteristics. Developing parametric equations to achieve this controllability in the vertical field-effect transistor (FET) design is an important first step toward...

  12. Introduction to and Advances in Self-Healing Polymers

    14 Jun 2007 | | Contributor(s):: Gerald O. Wilson

    The presenter briefly introduces the topic of Self-Healing Polymer research and continues to give a Survey of Ruthenium Metathesis Catalysts for Ring Opening Metathesis Polymerization-Based Self-Healing ApplicationsGerald O. Wilson is a Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of Materials Science...

  13. Orbital Mediated Tunneling in a New Unimolecular Rectifier

    25 May 2007 | | Contributor(s):: Robert Metzger, NCN at Northwestern University

    In 1997 we showed that hexadecylquinolinium tricyanoquinodimethanide is a unimolecular rectifier, by scanning tunneling microscopy and also as a Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) monolayer, sandwiched between Al electrodes. We have now seen rectification in a new molecule: this rectification can be...

  14. Piezoelectric Transducers: Strain Sensing and Energy Harvesting (and Frequency Tuning)

    15 Jun 2007 | | Contributor(s):: Toshikazu Nishida

    Acoustic pressure or mechanical force sensing via piezoelectric coupling is closely related to the harvesting of electrical energy from acoustical and mechanical energy sources. In this talk, mesoscale and microscale piezoelectric transducers for acoustic and vibrational sensing and energy...

  15. Dripping, Jetting, Drops and Wetting: the Magic of Microfluidics

    13 Jun 2007 | | Contributor(s):: David A. Weitz

    This talk will discuss some of the new opportunities That arises by precisely controlling fluid flow and mixing using microfluidicdevices. I describe studies to elucidate mechanisms of drop formation and use these to create new fluid structures that are difficult to achieve with my other method....

  16. SUGAR: the SPICE for MEMS

    21 May 2007 | | Contributor(s):: Jason Clark

    In this seminar, I present some design, modeling, and simulation features of a computer aided engineering tool for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) called SUGAR. For experimental verification, I use a microdevice that is difficult to simulate with conventional MEMS software. I show that the...

  17. Solid-State Lighting: An Opportunity for Nanotechnologists to Address the Energy Challenge

    25 Apr 2007 |

    More than one-fifth of the electrical power consumed in the U.S. is used for general illumination. Much of this energy is wasted to heat filaments in incandescent lamps, a century-old technology with an efficiency of about 5%. Fluorescent lighting is more efficient, but problems of color...

  18. BNC Annual Research Symposium: Nanoelectronics and Semiconductor Devices

    23 Apr 2007 | | Contributor(s):: David Janes

    This presentation is part of a collection of presentations describing the projects, people, and capabilities enhanced by research performed in the Birck Center, and a look at plans for the upcoming year.

  19. High-Aspect-Ratio Micromachining of Titanium: Enabling New Functionality and Opportunity in Micromechanical Systems Through Greater Materials Selection

    09 Apr 2007 | | Contributor(s):: Masa Rao

    Traditionally, materials selection has been limited in high-aspect-ratio micromechanical applications, due primarily to the predominance of microfabrication processes and infrastructure dedicated to silicon. While silicon has proven to be an excellent material for many of these applications, no...

  20. Atomistic Alloy Disorder in Nanostructures

    26 Feb 2007 | | Contributor(s):: Gerhard Klimeck

    Electronic structure and quantum transport simulations are typically performed in perfectly ordered semiconductor structures. Bands and modes are defined resulting in quantized conduction and discrete states. But what if the material is fundamentally disordered? What if the disorder is at the...